Contents

Page556

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Title UPA A Century Later
Subject Newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Journalism
Creator Utah Press Association
Publisher Utah Press Association
Contributors Cornwell, J. M.
Date 1996
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Identifier PN4844.U8 U8 1996
Source Original Book: UPN A Century Later
Language eng
Rights Management Digital image copyright 2005, University of Utah. All rights reserved.
Holding Institution University of Utah
Source Physical Dimensions 14 cm x 21.5 cm
Metadata Cataloger Kelly Taylor
ARK ark:/87278/s6319w0z
Setname uu_upa
Date Created 2005-05-10
Date Modified 2005-05-10
ID 416710
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6319w0z

Page Metadata

Title Page556
Description UTAH PRESS ASSOCIATION encourage new industries, help for the aged and tolerance among people and religions. It made him lifelong friends and bitter enemies, but all who knew him must admit that the seeds he planted bear good fruit today." CHARLES EDWARD HUISH, Eureka Reporter Born April 18, 1881 - Died September 25, 1946 Installed in Hall of Fame at Salt Lake City, 1980 Although many people, in all walks of life, give serious consideration to changing their occupation, few actually do so. Fewer still successfully make a change to a totally new field. And even fewer achieve both objectives when past the midpoint of life. One who did all these things was Charles Edward Huish, who at age 51 concluded a commendable career as publisher of the Eureka Reporter and began another as a theatre owner. Successful as a journalist, he became equally successful in the still-new motion picture business. The entire life of "Charlie" Huish was spent within 50 miles of his birthplace. A son of Orson s and Marintha Pickering Huish, who were British immigrants, he came into this life on April 18, 1881 at a farm home in what was known as Salem Field, near Payson in Utah county. He had no formal training for the work in which he would engage for more than three decades. However, in that day, that wasn't unusual. In fact, few early newspapermen were trained in any other manner than an apprenticeship of sorts under an instructor who'd also had little formal preparation. If it was a handicap, it isn't reflected in the now-yellowed files of newspapers which are more than three-quarters of a century old. Grammatical principals, typography - even the 556
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 562-UPA_Page556.jpg
Source Original Book: UPA A Century Later
Setname uu_upa
Date Created 2005-05-10
Date Modified 2005-05-10
ID 416567
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6319w0z/416567