Contents

Page403

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Title UPA A Century Later
Subject Newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Journalism
Creator Utah Press Association
Publisher Utah Press Association
Contributors Cornwell, J. M.
Date 1996
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Identifier PN4844.U8 U8 1996
Source Original Book: UPN A Century Later
Language eng
Rights Management Digital image copyright 2005, University of Utah. All rights reserved.
Holding Institution University of Utah
Source Physical Dimensions 14 cm x 21.5 cm
Metadata Cataloger Kelly Taylor
ARK ark:/87278/s6319w0z
Setname uu_upa
Date Created 2005-05-10
Date Modified 2005-05-10
ID 416710
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6319w0z

Page Metadata

Title Page403
Description PAPERS AS SEEN BY PRO'S AND OTHERS walked among the high and the low and uncouth. He hated the pompous, pitied the fool; and had no patience for a stupid rule. All he wanted for his own epitaph, was a single sentence paragraph: Written on stone and stuck in sand, "He was a good Newspaperman." Not all evidence of journalists writing about journalism are so profound. Humor prevailed in a three-paragraph treatise which traces to a pre-Linotype day when newspapers were still hand-set. Its content: "The editor of a weekly newspaper found that a prankster had stolen all the letter "S's" from his type cabinet, and so he inserted the following apology in his next issue: "Thome louthy thneaking thcoundrel hath tholen into our compothing room and thkeedaddled with all our etheth. We muth therefore apologithe to our readerth for the inthipid appearance of thith week'th Thentinel. "We would altho like to thtate that if at any time in the yearth to come we thee thith dirty thnake in the grath about the premitheth, we will thoot him tho full ofholeth he will rethem-ble a Thwith chethe. Thank you." In a similar vein, former newsman Art McQuiddy, then public relations director for United States Steel and the recipient of USPA's 1963 Honorary Publisher distinction, found and reprinted this gem in his Utah Publisher and Printer column when president of the Salt Lake Advertising Club: Xvxn though our typxwritxr is an old modxl, it works quitx wxll, with thx xxcxption ofonx of thx kxys. Just onx of thx kxys not working makxs thx diffxrxncx. In our club wx arx all kxy mxn and thx hxlp ofxach onx is vxry important. You may say, 'Wxll, I am only onx pxrson. I won't makx or brxak a projxct.' But rxmxmbxr, a club projxct nxxds thx activx participation of xvxry mxmbxr. So whxn you rxad about club projxcts, think of our typxwritxr and rxmxmbxr you arx nxxdxd and say to yoursxlf, 7 am a kxy pxrson, and am nxxdxd vxry much!'" A lament widely repeated in the press was called "Newspaper Critics Abound." It read: "Publishing a small paper is no picnic. If we print jokes, people say we're silly; if we don't they say we're too serious. 403
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 410-UPA_Page403.jpg
Source Original Book: UPA A Century Later
Setname uu_upa
Date Created 2005-05-10
Date Modified 2005-05-10
ID 416414
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6319w0z/416414