pg41

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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg41
Description from' South America...at the luscious peak of field-ripened flavorj'-ln the ration-free tomorrow, you'll enjoy them no matter where you live." (Thanks, no doubt, to super cargo-planes, which are also of that ration-free tomorrow,) Or under the portrait of a tire in all its pristine, unworn splendor: "Think of mileage that may outlast your car. Think of much less air pressure; no blowouts; lighter weight, yet stronger; the heat problem solved. The Tire of Tomorrow is well worth dreaming about.1" Or again, accompanying the picture of a miracle in mahogany veneer, plastic and brass trim: "Television reception-- a dream come true. The wonders of electronic science, when victory is assured, will bring you thrilling new achievements in convenience and entertainment." (And we can't even get tubes for our portable I) The magazines and newspapers are full of similar examples of this Tantalus school of advertising. And the cumulative effect of this sort of thing on civilian morale cannot be other than deplorable. You can't short-circuit the established response mechanism of the buying public without engendering some kind of frustration complex or schizophrenic manifestations in a lot of people. Much the same technique has been used in laboratories to bring about nervous breakdowns in rats and other trusting animals. And so, it is plain, as we have already suggested, that a campaign to recondition consumer response to commercial lures ought to be initiated. Certain definite instructions should be publicly promulgated. First, every reader of magazines and newspapers should be educated to reverse his accustomed top to bottom scanning of the pages whenever he runs across an advertiseinent.- In this way, he will go from text to art, not from art to text. Next, in reading the text, he should be trained to look for certain key words and phrases, or their variations: "tomorrow," "future," "when victory comes," "we are now engaged dn war production-, but-," "the day is coming," etc. The presence of any of these in the text will indicate to him that whatever commodity is pictured above, or however enticin'gjly.-^JLs not to be had for love or mShey i_:£GKP:"jl;he ;dur-,. tion. He can then turn to-*hg-;.full contemplation of the art'wofkp''if he so wishes, in the calm and sober knowledge that it is just that and not a representation of something that has physical reality. Or he can just skip the picture altogether and go back to his short story or serial. We feel that adherence to this regimen will preserve a lot of potential future customers from becoming vacant-eyed equivalents of those laboratory rodents, twitching between desire and doubt and mumbling incoherently about tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow... *.•»»•* Not only less romantic in itself, modern war has, by the very vast-ness of its encroachments, . largely dispersed the aura of wonder and mystery that used to hover over the seemingly inviolate places of the earth. The southwest Pacific was certainly one of these sanctuaries of man's yearning for the far-off and the strange. Its very place-names echoed in our minds like a litany of romance--Timor, Surabaya, Java, Sam-buran, Papua, Macassar, Celebes, the Coral Sea and a score of others. And into the magic web of its islands and seas were woven the rich tales of Melville, Conrad and Maugham,. Today, the spell is broken.. The lo-. cality is just another theater of war, drearier and hotter perhaps than most, but bristling like any other with all the blighting paraphernalia of modern warf.are. Its place-names are merely points of identity in communiques. We tried reading Conrad again recently, but while we enjoyed hin, something was gone from our old sense of complete absorption. And as we read, a silly little jingle kept popping into our head: Oh, G-ona is a "goner" And Buna is the same; The Jap in hot New Guinea Must wish he never came. The South Seas, we are afraid, will never be the same for us again. -Taro Katayama 41
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 043_pg41.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341488
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341488