pg9

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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg9
Description .--.duals and the general public as .the sources of unpleasant experiences. Ado- -. lescents and ignorant or uneducated ad- £. ults are usually named as the culpable parties. Only two incidents involving . physical demonstrations of antipathy are .-mentioned in the questionnaire returns, neither of them the result of any definitely established general public ill-feeling against the evacuee workers in . the communities involved. Incidentally, two or three workers felt that the resi- ,dent Japanese population of at least one outside community showed signs of unfriendliness toward incoming evacuees owing to uneasiness over the possible . effect their influx might have on the status of Japanese already living there. Finally, it is to be noted from the breakdown given previously that a smaller percentage of the non-agricultural workers reported unfavorable community and employer attitudes than did the farm workers. This may be due to the fact that the latter group's experiences belong to an earlier period in the relations between evacuees and outside communities, or it may be because the non-agricultural workers in general have come into contact with relatively better imfOrmed or better educated elements of the public, and as individuals rather than in large work groups. However that may be, the over-all picture of public and employer attitudes in the areas covered by the survey seems to be one of general receptiveness, so far as tolerating the presence of evacuee workers is concerned. But whether that tolerance points to future extension of economic opportunities to include fields other than farm labor and the minor service occupations is another matter. Certainly, the seasonal farm employment represented by sugar beet, potato and other crop work cannot be considered as a form of successful relocation for any but a very limited number of evacuees. This is particularly so in the case of a population like Topaz's, which is preponderantly urban and commercial in origin and background. And even were a sizable proportion of residents here willing to take up farm employment as a stop-gap or emergency stint, evidence from the questionnaire and corroborative information from other sources indicate that a great deal of improvement in all that pertains to working conditions, wage scales and contractual agreements is needed before this field of employment can be considered economically feasible. Although no question in the survey was specifically directed toward discovering farm workers' reactions to the practical aspects of their work, almost a third of those returning questionnaires took it upon themselves to mention the generally unsatisfactory physical and economic situations they encountered. These unsolicited references to poor housing and living facilities, contractual misrepresentations of crop yields on many farms and sub-standard wage scales in some types of agricultural industry are numerous enough to suggest that a great many more workers would have given similar testimony if the questionnaire had been pointed in this direction. - "C* A good evacuee response to the 'continued farm labor shortage foreseen for this year will perhaps thus be largely conditioned by the degree of improvement made by responsible government and farm agencies in these features of agricultural employment. This is reflected in the answers given by the farm workers to the question in the survey which asked: "Do your plans for the coming year include similar work?" As against the 36 per cent who answered in the affirmative, most of the remaining 64 per cent either gave a decisive "no" or indicated that their decision would depend on assurance of a better deal than they received last fall. The survey also shows that a similar, though not quite analogous, situation exists among • evacuees going into non-agricultural work, the unsatisfactory factor in their case being the incidence and distribution of types of jobs taken in relation to the whole range of employment possibilities. Nearly 35 per cent of those represented in the ques- ' tionnaire returns are in the category of domestic workers and, together with those in the related category of services (bus boys, kitchen workers^ etc.), comprise about half the total of those employed in the non-agricultural field.
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 011_pg9.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341456
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341456