pg40

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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg40
Description n! It occurs to us that a "Learn How to Approach a Certain Type of Magazine and Newspaper Advertising in War-Time" campaign would be a big contribution to civilian morale right now. Especially for those of the American reading public who still tend to follow reaction patterns built up in,the years before the present conflict. American advertising practice, as most of us know it, has generally been to put pictorial display ahead of text, the strategy obviously being to soften us up first with a luscious visual representation of the given product and then sock us with a verbal clincher. The success of the formula is borne out by the fact that Americans have bought more of everything, from aspirin to Lincoln-Zephyrs, than any other people in the world. We haven't any quarrel with the formula as such-in peace-time, that is. But the unthinking perpetuation of it at the present time by certain advertisers constitutes, we feel, a distinct hazard to the mental health of a large segment of our population. Before the war, if our ocular fancy was caught by some clever or persuasive 'limning of a commodity, we could fjo out and exercise our purchasing power in the assurance that the article in question was actually on the market. Currently, a different situation exists. A lot of commodities are no longer available for civilian consumption. We all know that and are willing to act accordingly, given a fair chance. But a number of advertisers, either from force of habit or from purely sadistic motives, are making the adjustment un-nec3ssarily difficult, it seems to us. These are the advertisers who insist on using seductive pictures of things which we have resigned ourselves to doing without, accompanied by a commentary to the effect that the said things will all be available, in endless variety and quantity, just as soon as the war is won. The psychological conflict which this sort of commercial legerdemain might create in the mind of the average American consumer is obvious* Because of his peace-time conditioning, he is apt instinctively to take any pictorial representation of an article in an advertisement as prima-facie evidence of its actual existence, of its availability for purchase. And in normal times, the text accompanying any such picture simply substantiated his assumption. Today, however, no such simple faith can sustain him. He sees an alluring photo-reproduction of something he needs or wants very badly, his pulses quicken in automatic anticipation despite the fact that OPA, the rationing board and his newspaper have been not been optimistic, and then he is told in the text below that the article, marvellously improved over any similar article he has ever seen, can be his when war production shifts again into peace production. Right now, the company is too busy manufacturing guns or tanks or planes. "Strawberries at your table, wet with morning dew," the words under a mouthwatering three-color print job says; "boysenberries, ripe figs, or papayas 40
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 042_pg40.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341487
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341487