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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg4
Description (b) The proportion of favorable to unfavorable publicity in the nation's press on the domestic Japanese situation. (c) The success of the advance educational campaign carried on by the WRA and other government agencies in the areas of relocation, together with the influence exerted by private organizations and by individuals interested in the matter. (d) The degree to which the people at large will apply to internal minority problems the war aims of this country as propounded by her leaders and other public figures. (e) The extent to which the manpower 'shortage may provide an entering wedge for the return of evacuees to usfcful production and the degree cjf -popular, not merely official, acquiescence to this eventuality. (f) The extent to which the activities of race-jingoist elements and political and economic pressure groups opposed to the Japanese in this country can be counteracted. (G) The degree of popular acknowledg-• ment accorded the recent re-opening of the Army to citizens of Japanese ancestry as an official token of thoir reinstatement as loyal Americana. (The success of the volunteer combat unit phase of the War Department ruling, incidentally, will undoubtedly do much to create favorable public opinion.) (h) The attitudes of the evacuees themselves toward their dispersion into the general population and the record established by their vang.uard group in the early stages of the relocation process. Upon the sort of social atmosphere which will eventually result from the operation and inter-action of these factors--and of others we may have overlooked--will largely depend the success or failure of the WRA policy of extensive resettlement. What that social atmosphere will be, it is still too early to forecast, but there are indications which point toward a hopeful future. For instance, American press reaction to the War Department's recent action in reopening the Army to loyal American citizens of Japanese descent has been pre- ponderantly favorable. Editorial comment has in general taken cognizance of the desirability of such a step, both as an act of simple justice to loyal citizens and as a demonstration of functional democracy to the . world at large. The program of dispersing evacuees .into the general population has likewise been accepted by a large section of the press in the same spirit,, although the .practicalities of the policy in relation to the current manpower shortage are given special emphasis. The whole trend of publicity in the press on the Japanese Question in this country thus seems to be away from the pre-evacuation type of newspaper comment which, taking its 'coloring from the West Coast press, left much to be desired in the way of intelligent and constructive appraisal of the domestic Japanese situation. The play has been taken away from
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 006_pg4.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341451
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341451