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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg7
Description community attitudes toward the evacuees and the relations of employers and workers. In only a few instances did workers indicate that their association with employers differed from the general reception they found in the community at large. On the whole, workers in both agricultural and non-agricultural fields found community and employer attitudes quite favorable. Typical comments in the questionnaires showing this are: "Friendly, very understanding and very kind employer. Community, with a with few exceptions, was very nice and treated us as if we were.members of that community. We felt at home almost wherever we went."-Beat worker, " • Shelley, Idaho, "We were very pleased with the way the employers and the people...treated us. The employers there regretted about us going back to the centers. But with a promise of coming back next season, they were happy, and so are we."--Beet worker, Nyassa, Oregon, "The American neighbors were very friendly. Up to the time that we moved into the community, they had had very little contact with Japanese, but they did not seem to be prejudiced against us. Mr. P___, our employer, realized that we were very inexperienced in farm work, but since we all did our best, he appreciated our efforts."-Beet worker, Idaho Falls, Idaho. : ;: : ' "There has been no racial discrimination of any sort. I have been treated like another fellow American, My employ-/ er as well as the guests here .have, treated me like my own mother ' would have."-Worker in ski lodge, Alta, Utah. "Our reception in the community was, very good and still is. Everybody goes about their own ways and they do not bother us."-Truck driver, Salt Lake City, Utah. "•-...' "The people here are very, very nice to me and they included me in everything they do, I have joined the YWCA here..." and they are very interested in me and want to know all about me and about the camp."-Maid, Des Moines, Iowa. , . In a number of cases, workers point out that-even where a certain amount of suspicion or unfriendliness existed in the community when ,they first arrived, continued association or directed effort, on the part' of .the evacuees often succeeded in creating a better understanding of their status. One beet . worker wrote: \ '•'--..,'-• "Reception was poor at first, but as the community became aware of the type of people they were hiring, they warmed up." . . " . Another beet worker made the .point that "outside people still think that we are in concentration camps,-branding us
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 009_pg7.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341454
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341454