pg20

Update item information
Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg20
Description To continue with Escalante, his diary records that he crossed what we .call Mud Lake, One of his men broke through the slight crust and sank below his knees. When, after much difficulty, he regained terra firma, he was a sorry-looking mess, covered with mud from head to toe. And Escalante says that this • produced much me^ri-meat at the expense f)f the unfortunate victim, A question may be raised as to why Escalante back-trailed from about Holder and headed w«st. The answer is that he went to visit the large lake which he named Laguaa d« Mi-era, is honor of his cartographer. That lake is now known as Sevier Lake. At that time, ao ' - fe water being used for irrigation, the Sevier River "was full and Clear Lak« was also at its extreme height. Escalante shows Clear Lake and Sevier Lake as one, connected by a narrow neck. This was probably not actually « the case at the time Of his visit; but ; the playa lakes were full, and from the | extreme flatness of the terrain and the » added deception of mirages, he was easi-i ly led into thinking that the two separ-j ate bodies of water were one. I 'VALLE SOLADO' On his map and also in his diary, Escalante calls Pahvant Valley, "Valle Solado," Spanish for "Valley of Salt," an extremely apt designation, for today we call this area the "Big Alkali Flat." Both names indicate an area highly mineralized. He also notes a stream, River Solado, coming from about Fillmore and meeting Clear Lake. This stream has long since been non-existent. After passing between Pahvant Butte end Clear Lake, he encountered Beaver Creek, which used to flow within the memory of men still living, although now dry because of the impounding of Beaver Creek waters in the Minersvllle storage reservoir. His next stop overnight was at the site of the Walter James farm near Black Rock, where there is an excellent spring and ancient Indian petro* glyphs on the rocks around it. He then followed Beaver Creek up to approximately where Milford is and thus passed out of Millard County. The last day of his sojourn in Mil-lard County was apprehensive. At unpacking time, one of the helpers remained fidgeting with an unruly pack on a beast and failed to respond te the call for matins. Another Spaniard, angry at this lapse of religious ferver, flew off the handle and a bitter quarrel ensued, involving much threatening language. The Indian guides became frightened, thought a killing was brewing and deserted. The next morning,. the remaining guide, fearful of being alone with the quarrelsome crew, also "hit the back trail" and vanished. Escalante was left without a guide, far from home »nd with tho tops of the mountains beginning to don their "tushar" caps (Ute for "white," the white of falling snow,) With winter coming on apace, lots were cast to determine whether to go on or return home, The latter course won out, and so began Escalante's dangerous wanderings to find a crossing of the great Colorado River to get home. One final word. At another stage of his lengthy peregrinations, when he was at the confluence of the Animas River near Aztec in what is now Now Mexico, Escalaftte wrote: "The fields of the two rivers are capable of taking care of a very proud race." But of Pahvant Valley, he jotted down only, "Valle Solado." The implications of that single bald notation are plain, -Frank Bcckwith Sr. Can this hard earth break wide The stiff stillness of snow And yield me promise that This is not always so? Surely, the warmth of sun Can pierce the earth ice-bound, Until grass comes to life Outwitting barren ground 1 - - : ..., -Toyo Suyemoto older of the two 80
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 022_pg20.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341467
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341467