pg27

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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg27
Description ing house and looking after their children, are now limited to one room and to eating in Dining Halls. They can now send their offspring to school when they are two and a half years old and find that they have more leisure-time than ever before* These women are the chief enrollees in the Sewing and Needlecraft School. Classes are held in English and Japanese, in the daytime as well as >f evening to accommodate everyone. Paper pattern drafting, cutting, tailoring, embroidery, trimming details such as braid and trapunto work, tatting, knitting, and crocheting are taught. Attention is also paid to the most valuable work of remaking and preserving old clothes to make them last longer. The school held its first exhibit and some of the work being produced is truly exquisite and finished. Similar to the Music School as far as administration and the age of its pupils are concerned, the Topaz Art School is a carry-over of the Tanforan Art School, Included in its curriculum are such sub* jects as clay modeling, composition, drawing, painting, sculptor and sketching. Flower Arrangement classes and Artificial Flower Making are also incorporated in the Art School. With the dearth' of fresh flowers in camp, it looks as if the two courses will be combined in the near future. The ingenuity of the teachers has been coming to the fore in the clever use of weeds and rocks and pebbles which are found in this area. The school has been the first to indulge in a commercial enterprise in order to earn money for supplies. They made and sold lovely Christmas and New Year cards. In the future, perhaps they may develop a cooperative industrial art group among the students of their flower making and fly-tying classes. ,,,,. •ft There is a series of courses conducted in Japanese for the benefit of the non-English speaking. At first people were reluctant to attend these classes because they felt that perhaps in going to lectures in Japanese, they would be viewed with suspicion* But the interest aroused by the first lectures plus the assurance that no censure"would follow attendance, resulted in enrollment of more and more people. To further the WRA policy of relocation, lectures are given on the geography of areas to which people might be resettled. Usually, a former native resident of that area is the lecturer and added testimony is invited from residents who might have lived there at one time or another. The honesty of these testimonials is sometimes a detriment because descriptions of drought or heavy snow are not encouraging. First aid classes are conducted in Japanese by a regular Red Cross instructor. Certificates are issued on completion of these courses. These classes are particularly helpful to those older safety wardens and fire inspectors whose command of English is limited. Surprisingly enough, there are many issei who attend the Mathematics classes which are given in Japanese. Algebra, arithmetic and plane geometry are offered. The people taking the courses seem to like them as mental exercise juat like working out crossword puzzles or playing a good game of checkers. Every night during the week, people come to hear talks on American Foreign Policy and World Affairs, American History, Common American Law, and Forums on Current Events. These comprise the Americanization section of the Adult Education D.epartmontc . Added to the above lectures are nights of listening to occidental classical and popular records, a weekly supplement to the Topaz Times which include sections on customs and manners, and an occassional marionette show or movies. At first the occidental music which was strange to most o'-f the listeners was completely unintelligible to them. But there were some records which they particularly enjoyed. Ballad for Americans, sung by Paul Robeson was one of these. One man said afterwards that he couldn't understand the words but he felt America in the surge of the music and the power of Robeson's singing. Another record which was received with great favor was Moussorgsky's Night on Bare Mountain. The legend behind the composition was explained and almost everyone there was •J7
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 029_pg27.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341474
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341474