pg11

Update item information
Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg11
Description different schools in 18 states, ranging from upper New York, through the Middle West and the Mountain region, down to Texas. On file at the student relocation office here are numerous letters from these re-established young citizens of the America of classrooms and dorms and study halls. What they have to say offers interesting supplementary testimony to that given by their fellow evacuees who have gone out to work. Almost without exception, these letters remark on the friendly and understanding treatment their writers have received from students and faculties a-like. One girl writes of finding the .head of the school waiting in the rain for her when she reached the station at three o'clock in the morning. Another mentions that she and the other Japanese students were guests at a special welcome dinner given by the school president and his wife. Yet another student notes that a number of nisei have received help from professors in securing jobs to meet school expenses. As to daily relations with Caucasian students., a recurrent note sounded in the letters is that normality and eoual acceptance prevail in all school activities. In a few instances, the nisei noticed that their new friends had never seen a Japanese before. "Some had imagined I would have a great deal of language difficulty,Tt writes one girl. "I don't think ;anyone had pictured me in a Japanese kimono, but some had pictured me with long hair and had hoped that I would bring a few odd looking objects and do some .odd things, but they were disappointed because I had a permanent." Only occasionally does any sense of disquiet stemming from the war enter in, and then only faintly or incidentally. "Most of the young college men of this city are going off to war and I wonder how their parents and they feel as to our coming," one student observes. Another notes: "A nisei out here puts up a barrier because he does not know how the average American is thinking about him." A few mention the possibility of military training units moving into their schools and wonder what effect that may have. All in all, the picture of college life for evacuee students is one of scarcely altered normality, eloauent evidence both of the effectiveness of the program by which the factors making for good reception had. be^en carefully checked in advance and of the spirit of understanding and tolerance characteristic of this country's institutions of learning and of those attending them. Of course, student relocation as a phase of the general resettlement program is limited in its application and promise, dealing as it does only with a special class of evacuees and governed by availability of scholarship funds and other factors. The future of large numbers of children still in WRA centers who are just getting out of high school is a problem which remains to be solved. But as a token and a guarantee .that the doors of higher education will continue to be open to Japanese in this country, student relocation is a bright spo.t on the horizon of the larger resettlement situation. Such, in general, is the outline of-the factors and prospects which define the future called relocation. Precisely what that future holds for nearly 8000 Topaz residents, and for some 100,000 other evacuees, will become apparent only with time. And time may bring various yet unforeseen considerations into play, either to simplify or to complicate the whole problem beyond present comprehension. Meanwhile, public attitudes and feelings toward evacuees, taken as a whole, are not unfavorable and show a trend toward futher improvement. Employment possibilities are expanding and machinery for making them available to all those qualified is in operation. The rest is largely up to the evacuees themselves-to their will and willingness to enter upon a new life with all that it may entail of necessary hardship and adjustment, to their determination to make the best of whatever opportunities may come their way, and, above all, to their recognition of the need to establish themselves once more as functional and useful elements in the American social pattern, ;•...•"••• --• .--Taro Katayama 11
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 013_pg11.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341458
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341458