pg39

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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg39
Description exccrsised, customs are not too varied in the United States, However, where manners are concerned, you. should bo worried; especially about table .manners. I've noticed several characteristic styles of eating in the dining halls and certainly none of them could be called orthodox methods. There is the 'slurp•• system. This consists of picking up ones dishes and letting the food glide gently into one's mouth. After the gliding process ends, the remainder is ;'slurped;l in. Then there is the "guzzle1' way of eating. The person employing this method takes quick, continuous nervous bites and swallows his food as if he were afraid that it might be taken away from him. The '"'clutch and thumb:! advocate is one who grasps his fork firmly in his fist and shovels his food onto it with his thumb and then gulps and gulps. , « One might blame all this on the un-' natural food and atmosphere. How can one be careful about eating with the proper utensils when all one is given is a fork? ?Jhy not "slurp"' and "gu-'.zle ; when all the food is thrown on one plate any which way? You should start rehearsing for the great outside by bringing your own utensils to the dining hall,. Its an aid to normality to be able to eat your jello with G spoon and well worth the dish-washing.which it involves. All of us eat much too fast. Eat more slowly. After all, the dining hall crew can't do any more than throw you out. All this practicing should be done so that proper manners will seem natural to you. If you do this, you won't get stage-fright and spill your water glass, or make bread pills and hardly dare to eat when you have your first meal ,away from the centers and in the midst of scrutinizing Caucasian eyes. ..^w,f^;w,,,,j,>,,r.» One thing you must realize is the impact of the war on people outside. There is rationing of food vihich you must consider when you think of going out. Coffee is rationed to 1 pound every 5 weeks for each person over 15 years of •age. You are not really aware of coffee rationing because we -only get our usual 1 cup at breakfast anyway. But if you were doing your own cooking, you would have to consider rationing every time you served coffee. If you get too generous at dinner when you have guests, you might end up by having no coffee by the time the fourth week rolls around. In that case, Instant Postum is a good substitute, or Ovaltine, either plain or chocolate flavored or plain chocolate are excellent. Sug.-r, too, is'rationed. To be sure of having plenty of sugar on hand for , . things which just have to have sugar, its a good idea to use substitutes whenever possible. Honey can be used in fruit compotes. ICaro syrup is good in custards and on cereals. The lack of sugar plus saccharine is a real boon to wcmon who want to lose weight, for saccharine has no food value at all. There are ways of utilising the still unrutioned jams an-d" jellies in the place of sugar. They make fine topping for custards end baked fruit when these don't have their usual ouota ->f sugar. Dissolving jelly in warm water and using the goo as a base for fruit punch is a tricky notion. r^£ ":* -? In most places there is a dairymen's ration of % of •- P">und of butter a week. The taste .if butter is hard to eoual, but nutritionally, margarine is a sound substitute. In fact, in comparison with some second quality butter, margarine, with its addition of units of Vitamin A and D, is better. Reloc7ti'-n in women's terms means adjustment to a life different from our farmer as well as present way yf living and as such should be a challenge. -M'?.rii Kyogoku 39
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 041_pg39.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341486
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341486