pg37

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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg37
Description The debacle continued until all the alluvium was washed away and the resistance of the limestone reef was reached, The process of excavation then changed from the mere transportation of loose dirt to the corrosion of solid rock, and the flow assumed the phase of an ordinary river, having a volume commensurate with the iii-flow of the lake. But" before this' happened,1the level of Lake Bonne-•ville had dropped 375 feet. The name Provo was given this new level because of a great delta, which is at once a notable feature of the shoreline and a prominent landmark in Utah Valley near the town of Provo. The water lingered here several times longer than it did at the Bonneville horizon. During the Provo stage, the lake was 13,000 square miles in area-11,500 belonging to the main body and 1500 to the Sevier body. Although by reason of its position at the top of the series, the Bonneville shoreline is the most conspicuous-the one most deeply carved is the Provo, Because of this, the Provo shoreline is easily recognized in all parts of the basin without the necessity of either tracing its meanderings or measuring its altitude. The hills to the west of Topaz have conspicuous Provo terraces. From the Provo level the lake fell slowly. The influx of streams and glaciers was never consistently great e-nough to offset the evaporation. As it dried to its present level in Great Salt Lake, the water paused only once long enough to carve a noteworthy shoreline- the Stansbury shore, at which stage the lake surface was 7000 square miles. Toward the later stages of desiccation, the lake divided itself into 10 or 12 independent bodies of water, each with its own interior basin. Two of these now contain lakes; the others for the most part contain playa. lakes with beds of salt. The Sevier Basin, in which Topaz is located, is exceptional in that its lake-30 miles in length when first surveyed-disappeared in 1922, primarily because the water of its tributary stream was siphoned for irrigation. Out of many of the flat, sedimentation-formed plains which remained in the Bonneville Basin after the lake receded, jagged mountains rise as abruptly as pyramids in the desert. They are in reality incomplete, or rather partially submerged, mountains, though some of them tower as high as. 3000 feet. It's: impossible to determine how deep beneath the lacustrine plain their bases lie, but 2000 feet is a moderate estimate. Examination of the sediments reveals two distinct strata - white marl, relatively thin and calcareous, lying above yellow clay, relatively thick and alumi* nous - separated by a plain of erosion^ indicating a dry epoch between two humid ones. Hence, there were two epochs of high water, with an interval during which the basin was nearly or quite empty. Lake Bonneville, then, was the second of two great lakes which existed in the Bonneville Basin, Though the first epoch of high water lasted five -'tines longer than the second, it never rose to the Bonneville level. It cut a shelf 90 feet below the Bonneville shore, and then dried away. Because of its position between the Bonneville and the Provo terraces, this shoreline is called the Intermediate. So chronologically the ^principal shorelines are Intermediate, Bonneville, Provo, and Stansbury. The pre -Bonne ville lake which formed the first of these disappeared some time in the Pleistocene. Of Lake Bonneville which carved the last three - Great Salt Lake is the outstanding remnant. And it, too, is receding. .,^!V .^,'iojjj, ov •, „ a Yamada 37
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 039_pg37.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341484
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341484