pg8

Update item information
Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg8
Description as potential enemies of this country. We convinced some of the influential families of the error of the above conclusion." As to the relatively few instances in which existence of a positive unfriendly attitude on the part of the community or the employer is noted by workers, they offer little basis for arriving at any definite conclusions, either as to geographical distribution or as to underlying causes. Thus, among the agricultural workers, mentions of unfavorable attitudes are almost equally distributed between Idaho and Utah", No such mentions are given by Oregon workers, but here, since only a single community in that state is represented in the questionnaire returns, it is pat-r ently impossible to make a case for that state as against the other two. Then there are instances where contradictory impres™ sions of the same community are given by different workers, as in the case of Cald-well, Idaho. One worker wrote: "People in the city of Caldwell were very hostile tq us. We were not permitted in most of the restaurants and barber shops. Many times we heard people make ....hostile remarks right at us." In direct contrast to this, there were others reporting: "It 'was just like any community .• back home and the people were very friendly," or, "The community of Caldwell was very friendly towards us except for a few oases, which of course should be expected." From reasons given or implied by workers who mention unfavorable conditions or incidents, it can only be assumed that most of these were special cases, rather than the results of any one pervading factor. For instance, two or three workers related their encounters with unfriendly attitudes to the fact that the latter became noticeable on or near the anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Others noted that cordiality and uncordiality seemed to be in direct ratio to the state of the harvest, there being a marked cooling off of friendliness just as soon as the need for evacuee labor ended. Most workers, however,-were careful to distinguish between individuals or certain classes of indivi- 8
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 010_pg8.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341455
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341455