pg21

Update item information
Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg21
Description The Saint, as'usual, lay on his back on the meshi-hole table. He did not say anything. He seldom said anything when he was on the table, except in his sleep. And he was not asleep now.. Blue-black smoke was issuing from his nostrils as from a pair of smokestacks. He was puffing on his Regis, . (. I contemplated him. . It is good to contemplate something, • The Hindoo saints contemplated their navels as they sat in meditation. I contemplated my friend . and collaborator whom the public has now.learned to call "The Saint" because of his uncanny, almost superhuman power of deduction. And the Saint ,. on his part seemed to be contemplating the smudge-soiled sheetrock which made up the ceiling. The Saint had a figure which could only be, described as extraordinary, especially when he was lying on the table. : His head had the tendency of caving in through the masonite table-top so that .his nose alone was conspicuous on his silhouette. /'. This part of his anatomy reminded one of the. Topaz hospital smokestack which, for unexplained reasons, had red squares painted near the upper end. The Saint's smokestack had, for undisclosed reasons, red splotches instead of squares. More remarkable than his smokestack, however, was his abdomen. This was a veritable mountain range extending from north to south and was called the Continental Divide, It was like a series of dormant volcanoes which rumbled and puffed and exploded now and then, creating craters where the buttons burst. Suddenly the Saint elicited a sound. "My dear Moto," said he, without turning his head toward me, "Did my Regis smoke up the ceiling thus?" I was about to answer. My intention, however, was interrupted by the shrill cry of a woman in the distance, followed a few minutes later by the sound of heavy shuffling feet on the concrete : floor. "Excuse preeze," said the proprietor of the feet. I looked up to find the terror-stricken face of a policeman. "Excuse preeze, Saint Son," he said, his voice strained and shaky. "A bodyl A body in the Shah House! Preeze come." "A body?" said my friend in Evacuese, still dreamily contemplating the ceiling. "Gin a body meets a body comin' s-roo ze rye..." "Zat's right, Saint Son," said the newcomer excitedly. "How jew know? There was rice comin' s-roo ze body," This was an astonishing announcement. I could imagine rye coming through the body or vice versa, but rice! The announcement so astonished my friend that he sat up, and as he sat up one of the peaks in the Continental Divide exploded, strewing a vest button all over the floor. "You mean rye comin' s-roo ze body, don't you?" The Saint asked to make sure, suspiciously eyeing the newcomer's blue
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 023_pg21.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341468
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341468