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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg16
Description ple things so that I would grasp a little of it. She would pick up her teacup and ask, '''Satsuma? Satsuma, Japan? I would nod eagerly. "Yes, Satsuma." She came often. Every time we sat silently, sipped tea, and smiled. Every once in awhile her Japanese husband TV came and thanked me. "She is happy. She has a friend." "I do not speak to her. I cannot express myself," I told him. "No, no. She understands. You do not have to talk," he said. Ah, I can never forget her. She knitted baby clothes for your daddy. "I think it will be a girl," she said. But it was your daddy. I cried when she had to go away again. Yes, it was long ago. All your uncles and aunts came afterwards: Mamoru, Yuri, Willie, Mary Ann, Yoshio and Betty. Yes, time is your friend in America, children. See, my face - and hands are wrinkled, my hair gray. Jjy teeth are gone, my figure is bent. These are of America. I still cannot speak English too well, but I live among all kinds of people and come and go like the seasons, the bees, and the flowers. Ah, San Francisco, my dream city. My San Francisco is everywhere. I like the dirty brown hills, the black soil and* the sandy beaches. I like the tall buildings, the bridges, the parks and the roar of city traffic. They are of me and I feel like humming. You don't understand, Johnny? Ah, you are young. You will. Your grandma wants to be buried here in America. Yes, little ones. Once I had a brother and a sister in Japan, Long ago they wrote me a letter. Come back, sister, they said. We want to see you again. Hurry. Oh, it was long before you were born. But I did not return. I never saw them again. Now they are dead. I stayed in America; I belong here. Now I do not ask myself: why did I come? The fog has lifted. Yes, Annabelle and Johnny, we are at war. I do not forget the fact. How can I ever forget? My mother country and my adopted land at war! Incredulous I After all these years when men of peace got along together. grandma sometimes Your grandma sometimes cries in the night when her eyes open. No, not for herself. She is thinking of your Uncle Mamoru in the U.S. Infantry "somewhere" overseas and his comrades, and the people going through hardships and sufferings. In time of war, weak men fall and the strong triumph. You will learn, little ones, that life is harsh at times. War is painful. If there wore no war we would not be in a relocation center. We \MOuld be back in our houso on Market Street, hanging out our wash on the clothesline and watering our flower garden. You would be attending school with your neighborhood friends. Ah, war is terrifying. It upsets personal life and hopes. But war ' has its good points too. In what way, Johnny? Well, you learn your lessons quickly during wartimes. You become positive. You cannot sit on the fence, you must choose sides. War has given your grandma an opportunity to find where her heart lay. To her surprise her choice had been made long ago, and no war will sway her a bit. For grandma the sky is clear. The sun is shining. But I am old. This is where you come in. Children, you must grow big and useful. This is your world.... _ -,,,,,_ Now run along to bed like a good ^ojr and girl. Sleep and rise early. Tomorrow is coming, children. :*. : - Toshio Hori 16
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 018_pg16.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341463
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341463