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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg17
Description N MDQIAIRD COQJN (Editor's note: In the last issue of TREK, Frank Beckvath ST., publisher of the MiHard County Chronicle, described some of the topographical features of the Pahvant Valley, in which Topaz is located. In the present article, he relates a colorful episode in the historical background of this area, the first recorded entry of a white man into Mil-lard County, over a century and a half ago.) .> ^^ The first white person of whose entry into Millard County a written record exists' was Father Escalante, a Roman Catholic priest of Santa Fe, New Mexico, who traversed this area in the fall of 1776, 167 years ago. It is highly probable that before his entry, Spanish raiders visited this and contiguous territory for trade, as well as for the purpose of capturing "Yuta" men and women and selling them as slaves in the settled areas of California and New Mexico, a profitable business. But of them, we have no written record. (The practice of slave trading, incidentally, existed down to the time of Brigham Young,- who put a stop to it.) The purpose of Escalante's visit here was to find a more northern route from the mission fields of New Mexico to Mon-terey, California, where other missions were then already established. The direct route from Santa Fe to California was in the summer almost unbearably hot and fraught with much danger because of the scarcity of water. If a more northerly route could be found feasible, it would provide cool passage in hot weather, facilitate communication and favor trade. Also, and more important to Escalante, he could report to his sovereigns in Spain where missions might be established in this new territory and his labor of saving the souls of the pagan Indians be expanded. Although the party was under the leadership of one Dominuez, the historian and writer, Escalante, "stole the show," and his diary and accompanying map again proved the pen mightier than the sword. The journey itself has ever since been identified with the subordinate in command, the peaceful Catholic padre. As the scope of this article is more or" less limited to Escalante's travels in Hi Hard County proper, his journey before reaching this area will be passed over with just a brief mention of a circumstance attending the earlier portion of his trek. It should be pointed out that the pro-historic Indians were (as their successors are today) great visitors; they thought nothing of going several hundred miles to visit friends, living off the country as they went. So Escalante notes that fairly early in his trail from Santa Fe, in what is now the state of Colorado, he encountered "Yu-tns"-Indians on a visit froo what is now Utah to distant friends. He found them friendly, and through an interpreter, he secured the services of a guide who was to conduct his party to a feasible crossing of the turbulent Green River and lead Escalante to what
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 019_pg17.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341464
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341464