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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg10
Description . As a barometer of future ^ or even of current, prospects in this field of employment, the indications given by the survey admittedly may not be very accurate. There are evidences that an increasingly wider range of employment opportunities is being opened up to qualified evacuees as time goes on. An examination of the list of outside work Df-ers at the Topaz placement office, for instance, reveals that the incidence of domestic and related categories of work to other classes of employment is becoming noticeably smaller than at an earlier date, when practically all offers were of the domestic type. Currently listed are over 200 openings, and while work in private homes still outnumbers work in any other single classification., the, range of non-domestic jobs offered embraces a fairly wide variety of types from railroad maintenance work to jewelry repairing. With the WRA field offices and stations going into effective operation, a further expansion of employment possibilities can reasonably be expected. It is obvious that without such a widening of work opportunities in the non-agricultural field, the successful . relocation of a population such as Topaz's is going to be difficult. Not only predominantly urban in composition, this population has a relatively high quotient of persons with specialized commercial skills and backgrounds and of young people with college or other technical training, How soon a broadening of the employment opportunity base commensurate with the type of skills and backgrounds represented here will take place, it is impossible to predict. That there are si^nis of progress toward this eventuality, we have already noted, but the fact remains that at present there is still a disparity between the range of work sought and the variety of work offered.-1- As recently as the last week of to YXolThis seems to be generally prevail- rfJi ing condition. For instance, the Febru- -«-;• ary bulletin Cf the Committee on Re- «?• settlement of Japanese Americans re- ports: "A great number of evacuees are -- desirous of taking office positions, whereas a great number of job offers February, for instance, the nunber of indefinite leaves granted up to that time, when broken down by the types of outside occupations involved, revealed the following: Domestic 46, services 44, agriculture 35, army 9, clerical and sales 8, housewives 4, industry 4, professional 3. Any prolonged continuation of such a distribution over the employment scale obviously cannot represent resettlement in the best sense. And it can only be hoped that the time factor, together with the announced aims of the WRA. employment policy and the extension of the growing favorable public attitude into the commercial and industrial fields, will bring about an eventual improvement in the utilization of evacuee abilities on the outside. •if** */•> ~*-MV -s.i-. • V- :* '• . -*_ No consideration of the resettlement problem is perhaps complete without some mention of student relocation, -which in many respects offers the brightest picture of the whole attempt to re-integrate the evacuee element into American life. Admittedly a special phase of the main problem, with a narrower range of implications, the student relocation program in its development up to the present time nevertheless has connotations which bear on the general situation of the Japanese in this country. Collectively, one of the largest segments of the evacuee population to begin relocating, the students have also functioned as one of the earliest factors in re-establishing the normal contacts between the Japanese and the general public which were disrupted by evacuation. On the level of higher education, at least, the world of the evacuees and the outside world have managed to create a connecting link of better understanding whose future benefits to the general welfare of the Japanese in America are incalculable, Topaz,- like the other WRA projects, has sent out its quota of these students. As of the first week of March, some 54 young people of this center had been granted leaves to attend some 32 are for farm hands and domestic workers. . -. ' : '
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 012_pg10.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341457
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341457