pg23

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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg23
Description "You mean inside ze partition where ze bathtubs are?" "Yes, Saint Son, it was zere aw-rye. It rooked rike a wooman. But maybe it was a man. It was about twenty-fibe, or anywhere between foeteen and foety," "All I could find was a pile of white substance," "the Saint spoke now in his Oxfordian. "It looked gooey and had the shape of a football." The Warden gasped. "Ze body is messing I" he cried, and added,after a . second's thought: "Ze riceJ Ze rice! Zat mus be ze rice I I tol jew rice was corn-in' s-roo ze body!" "Brilliant, officer. A remarkable example of criminological deduction. But, tell me, what part of the body?" "Ze foeheadr Saint Son. Zere was a hole in ze foehead and rice was comin' out of zat hole,•" The Saint contemplated for a moment. Then with a casual gesture: "All right, my friend, you may now return to your duty. Home, my dear Moto. We must now indulge in a little research on the subject of L-I-C-E, rice." In his Obsidian Avenue apartment, I sat sipping his G-I coffee while he fumbled in his suitcases and finally brought out a folder marked "R" and an article he called L-Y-E, rye. "Here they are, my dear fellow, I have a complete file on the subject and just two glasses," he said, seating himself comfortably on his cot. "Since our companion of a minute ago has utterly failed to produce the corpus delicti, we must now contemplate the only evidence we have been able to procure." "You mean the pile of white substance?" "Naturally, my dear fellow," he said reassuringly and produced from the inside pocket of his coat a small envelope, "Here," he went on, "we have a sample of the substance. As the Warden told us there is no question of its being rice. The microscope, furthermore, will disclose the origin of the grain." "The microscope?" "Yes, my dear Moto. It will show its exact dimensions." And the Saint produced from another pocket a microscope,. "Look at it, Moto, The average size of each of the grains under examination is approximately 1.345 x 3.7 mm. Now look in the folder and see what the Bureau of Standards prescribes." I found the prescription immediately.. "1x2 mm.(" I told my friend. "Good, Now, which block in Topaz has the squattiest residents?" "Every block," I replied. "Right-ho.Which block has the tallest residents?" "The tallest?'-' I said uncertainly. "Nowhere, except Block 2, perhaps. But they are Caucasians." "That is quite all right. We all hail from Caucasus in one way or another, .Now, if Block 2 has the tallest persons, then, my dear fellow, this rice originates in their meshi-holo." I felt dizzy and bewildered. The deduction seemed too fantastic. Yet in all my twenty-odd years of collaboration with the Saint, had he ever been wrong once?-I waited for him to explain. "To alleviate the pains of your bewilderment," he said with a broad smile, "let us take a further peek into the report ." "According to Monograph on Race and Rice prepared by the Rice Institute," I read on, "long rice tends to make its eater long in stature as well as in payment. On the other hand, round rice makes him round and squatty regardless of how it is consumed, "There, my dear fellow, is the answer," said the Saint with a twinkle in his eyes, "Block 2 has long people. This rice is of the longer variety. Ergo, it comes from Block 2." "Ergo," I put in brightly, "the missing body comes from Block 2, It is a tall Caucasian girl between fourteen and forty, or exactly twenty-seven, and..." "Now, my dear Moto," interrupted the Saint, "not so fast. There is that possibility, of course. Or even a probability. But that, my friend, is too simple. If the solution were so simple, how could this be a mystery novel?" I turned my eyes away from i*y friend in embarrassment. He had often chided me for my habit of jumping at conclusions, I had committed the same mistake once again. "I am sorry," I apologized, "I've 23
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 025_pg23.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341470
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341470