pg28

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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg28
Description moved by the wild beauty of the music. There usually is a large audience on current events night; with a surprising number of women in the group. It is a chance for everyone who misses the vernacular papers to catch up on what is happening in the world today, The discussion which follows each topic is orderly and perspicacious. One can't help but be impressed by the political awareness of some of the people present. .,»*«,-,» ' K- -JfxS v The school which most resembles the adult classes on the outside, is the one which offers Vocational and In-Service Training. The theory of these classes is to give an elementary course of 6 weeks or so on any subject which is desired. After the course is given, the students are given practical training in these subjects as apprentices. Then as the regular vitxdcers in certain fields are drafted to go out and resettle, these apprentices take over the job until it is their turn to leave. The hope is to keep this process moving steadily along so that as people are given work on the outside, life inside the camp will proceed smoothly without a hiatus. In the trades such as carpentry and plumbing, the apprentice is assigned to a supervisor. The supervisor may ask for apprentices when his labor reserves are running low. He is required to grade each apprentice in the things which are necessary for the apprentice to do bc-a master of his trade, there are some difficul- "fore he can be Of course, > It 318 •tog. t,' irf .5; Were it not bettor thus to die, While blood is warm with high endeavor And mind and heart alike deny The doubters and the cautious clever, Than, skeptic, cling to life and know The years whose gnawing rodent teeth May eat through craven flesh and show The bone of vain regret beneath? -Taro Katayama ties in this program. There is the very great lack of materials and equipment due to the war, There is no opportunity for students to practice welding because the welding equipment is constantly tied up with repairs needed for camp. There are no typewriters for the schools, Future stenographers who leave camp will be competent in taking shorthand but will have to have basic training in typewriting before they can get jobs. Those in auto mechanics or radio repairing classes cannot get spare parts. *= One field in which this system is working well is the agricultural. Most of the residents of Topaz are from the urban communities, If they did come from farms, the farms were usually devoted to flowers or truck-crops or some specialized form of agriculture. Here men are being trained in the type of farming which is necessary for them to know if they are to makQ any sort of contribution to the food for victory campaign. Hardly anyone at the hog-farm or cattle-ranch knew anything about hogs or cattle but they are doing a good job of raising live-stock. •.•'-•- No Adult Education Department is complete without a few academic courses and the department in Topaz is no exception. Courses from cooperatives to phonetics are offered with varied enrollment. These courses are attended as .a whole, by a small number of young adults who are in the out of high school-into college graup. Many things have happened to the 100,000 Japanese and Americans of Japanese ancestry since the war began. The adults among us were formerly educated in such a way that our lives were set in a constant limited pattern. The war has changed all that. The one good result which may come through evacuation might be having its beginnings in the Adult Education program, It is attempting to prepare us in new ways of life so that we can take our place in the American scene with all other residents of America when we go out of the relocation centers, -Marii Kyogoku 28
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 030_pg28.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341475
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341475