pg38

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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg38
Description Relocation is in the air. Everywhere people are asking, "What do you plan to do?" of each other. Suppose you are planning to go out sooner or later, there are some preparations you ought to be making right along. Take the matter of clothes. When evacuation was imminent you probably thought like thousands of other young x^omen and decided that since you were going into the wilderness, there was no necessity for you. to bring along any of your really nice things. So you packed and stored them away and invested your money in slacks and jeans and lots of colorful shirts. Now you're in a quandary because if you do go out, you certainly can't show up for work in jeans and a flannel shirt. The first thing to do is to send for your things from the coast if you already haven't done so. Don't worry about your clothes being hopelessly out of date because ever since the war started, tha tendency has been to standardize styles as they were in 1940 and 41. The thing th?t you may find has happened might be that you've outgrown your clothes. There are awful tales of people gaining 15 and 20 pounds where the weight does the least good. If your clothes have wide seams, remake them, if not, start getting thin. If you wore so unforeseeing as to have given your clothes away before evacuation, that is dreadful, but there is still hope if you make the right adjustments right now. When you buy things whether in the canteen or by mail use your good judgment. Don't keep on buying rugged stuff. If you, want shirts to wear with your slacks, buy the kind which will go with any skirt you might want to wear later. When you buy shoes, buy good flats which you can wear around here and yet can wear outside with good grace. Don't buy inexpensive things thinking to yourself that they will be just for temporary wear in camp. Buy things which might cost more but have simple lines which are good practically forever. Don't turn up your noses at the If you buy the best wares , you'll get every bit of your money's worth. Cleaning, is going to be difficult and an expensive item when you're first trying to make your own way so pL?.n your wardrobe from now to contain nsrr^ny washable things as possible. And practice washing right now in campf% Selection of clothes isn't the only preparation that you can make for resettlement. At o seminar one night last month, the suggestion was made that one practical step people could take to ready themselves was to become acquainted with American manners and customs, As far as customs go, we don't have to worry too much because as slong as tho virtues of courtesy and common sense are catalogues, listed there. 38
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 040_pg38.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341485
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341485