pg34

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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg34
Description stare at me, but not so much as to make me feel uncomfortable. Often I hear them whisper to each other "...Chinese.,.Japanese,..?" Only once did some one yell at me, and that was when a Boston drunkard shouted, "Oh, Chinis pliss." The only people that really stare and stare, although merely in curiosity, are other Orientals, mostly Chinese. It is scarcely necessary to point out that those who have probably never seen a nisei before will get their impression of the nisei as a whole from the relocated students. It won't do you or your family and friends much good to dwell on what you consider injustices when you are questioned about evacuation-. Rather, stress the contributions of these people to the nation's war effort. Mention the great number of nisei in the United States Army, the way the Manzanar Boy Scouts protected the American flag from a pro-Axis mob, how the evacuees are engaging in wartime agriculture, and you will do the Japanese in this country more good than talking about "discrimination." College isn't exactly an escape to the Ivory Tower it might have been a year or so ago. Just as on the outside, you are conscious that a war is ^oing on. There aren't so many men students as in bygone .days. Some schools have closed entirely or refused new admissions so that the Army and Navy might use the campuses as training centers. You're asked not to use the dorm elevators or needlessly use up electricity in other ways. There are practice blackouts which have a neat habit of coming on the night before important exams. Officer procurement agents from the armed services will come to the campus, but you know you justments weeks. Living vary. The by the end of a couple of accommodations will of course boarding houses can be good, bad or just so-so, but generally the dormitories operated by the college are very comfortable. In the best dorms, there are maids who wait on the table and clean up the students' rooms every day. You don't have much money? If you can't meet the annual tuition of about $1000 in the best private colleges, there are the less expensive, but just as good, state colleges of the Midwest. Perhaps you can get some scholarship. Due to the universal labor shortage, it isn't so terribly difficult to pick up a part-time job. However, it'll be hard to go through college entirely on your earnings. -Lillian Ota LILLIAN OTA, 21, a junior Phi Beta Kappa from the University of California at Berkeley (1941-42), is now finishing her senior year at Wollesley on a special scholarship. One of the earliest to be relocated under the student relocation program, she left Tanforan Assembly Center on her scholarship in August, 1942. She was on the editorial staff of the Daily Californian while at U. C. During her stay at Tanforan, she was women's editor of the Totalizer, camp paper. At Wellesley, she is continuing her studies as a history major. haven't much chance of being accepted. Nevertheless, you can always participate in the war effort by rolling bandages, smashing tin cans or helping the farmers out with their crops. The going might be a little tough in getting used to the classes at another college, but you'll make ad- From seeds by steel and lightening sown In Asia's darkening plain; From compost rich in blood and bone, The dower of Europe's slain; From tillage rending hill and field, Will nothing come to pass? earth no fearful fruitage yield, No judgment rise, with grass? -Taro Katayama
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 036_pg34.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341481
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341481