pg18

Update item information
Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg18
Description is now Utah Lake and Provo. (The word "Yuta" is from the Ute Indian language, : denoting "ingwi," or "the people"--spe- ;' cifieally the Ute Indians, who lived re- ' latively further north, or "higher up" than Santa Fe. Hence, in text books, the word is now used to denote "high,high up mountain tribes.") This fondness of the Indians for distant visiting, resulting in their acquisition of topographical knowledge of the whole area, must be firmly kept in mind; for without the aid of their guidance, Escalante's journey would have been immeasurably more difficult. At Provo, he found the aborigines very cordial and hospitable, acquiring there two additional guides to take him through the southerly portion of his route, since they knew the way later called the "Old Spanish Trail," which led almost directly to what is now Los Angeles. Escalante remained with the Indians at Provo for a while, giving gifts and preaching to them. He then continued his journey, passing through what is now Nephi and entering MiHard County near the present crossing of the Sevier, a trifle further down the river, where it was easily forded. He entered Round Valley, passed through what is now the town of Scipio and up Scipio Pass, where the spot is now marked by a cement monument on U.S. Highway 91. He continued south to about where Holden is, or possibly a short distance below it, where he camped overnight. He next back-trailed to about Church Springs and then cut abruptly westward, making a large loop around what is now the Deseret area and camping twice overnight before he passed between Pahvant Butte and Clear Lake. MAP AND DIARY To digress a moment: Escalante wrote a day-by-day journal, his famous Diario (diary). Supplementing this, his cartographer, Don Miera, carefully noted the topography of the country traversed and made a map. The diary and map were sent to the King of Spain as Escalante's report. The map, dated January 3, 1777, lay for years in the Department of Maps and Archaeology in Madrid, Spain. Later, a copy was sent to Washington, D.C., and the present writer secured a photostatie copy of it in enlarged size from the Librarian of Congress. Data for the map which accompanies this article, showing Escalante's route in Millard County, were taken from this photostatie copy. (Escalante's diary, translated by Dean Harris, appears in the volume, "The Catholic Church in Utah.") Escalante's latitude is very accurate, correct to within a fraction of a degree, having been calculated by the simple method of measuring the height of Polaris. His longitude, however, is somewhat inaccurate. By error, Miera shows that the Sevier River is a continuation of the Green River, which they crossed near Jensen, Utah. Escalante makes a note that in his opinion this cannot be, since the river in question, if it were a continuation of the other, should be larger, being further along and augmented in its course, whereas in actual fact it was smaller. .This is practically the only major error in the Escalante map, and that is corrected by his note. -**» ACROSS MILLARD COUNTY To continue with Escalante's party across Millard County: Shortly after leaving Church Springs, the party met some "bearded Indians." This is notable, since beards on Indians are extremely uncommon. Then, running short of water, the group sent two men ahead to seek some. The latter met some Indians, natives, who, learning the want of the travelers, returned to their teepees and brought a supply of water for the party. This incident is particularly mentioned here to show that at the time of white men's earliest entry into this area, aborigines were found living either in teepees or the more substantial wickiups ("khanevn" is the Ute word for house), indicating that the area of the Pahvant Valley, including Topaz, was occupied by nomads and semi-settled families. Any resident of Topaz who will diligently search around the outskirts of the center should find arrowheads, pottery sherds and other artifacts of that pre-historic Indian occupation. The writer has many, several of which were found on the very land on which Topaz is located. 18
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 020_pg18.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341465
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341465