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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg25
Description One result of America's entry into the war has been the establishment of many new types of schools and classes. There are welding, riveting, machine tooling, nutrition, chemistry, engineering, drafting, mechanical drawing, first aid, nurse's aide, air raid precautions, child care, and many other classes, each with a group of students who are usually strangers to the subject which they are studying. The Japanese of. the West Coast of the United States and their citizen children have thus far been rather out of the u-sual war effort. Their contribution has been different from other residents of the United States, One aspect of the war, however, which is the same to these evacuated people as to those living outside of relocation centers, has been the picture of people going to schools and classes they never expected to attend. The Adult Education Section of Topaz has grown into a complex and comprehensive organization. Some parts of it had their beginnings in the Tanforan Assembly Centeri The Music, Art and Basic English schools of Topaz were transferred almost bodily from Tanforan. Other schools have been added here as the need for then has arisen. The set-up of the whole thing is a series of schools which are integrated into one under the administrative direction of one person, Dr. Laverne Bane, who is responsible in turn to the superintendent of education. The various schools, Basic English, Music, Art, Sewing and Needlecraft, Non-English Speaking, Vocational and In-Service Training, and Academic, each has its own supervisor who works under Dr. Bane. The Basic English School is one of the most interesting of the various schools. The pupils range in age from 15 to 79 and the scenes in the classrooms must be similar to the ones in Turkey when it changed its alphabet, or in Ken- tucky areas when whole regions, from granddaughter to grandmother, started to go to school, Why' do people attend these classes? The answers are as varied as the people who come. Some are ashamed of speaking brokenly and want to learn to say things correctly. Others want to write letters to former employers, to former neighbors, to sons in the army, to daughters who have left relocation centers. There are those who want to learn to read the newspapers and magazines and to listen to the radio programs. They feel that their life will become richer in that way, A-mong the younger students are kibei, those Americans who have returned from Japant They want to learn English, the language of their country so that they may become useful citizens. The attitudes of the students are also varied, A few are embarrassed because-they have been in America so long and yet have not learned their country's tongue. Most are eager and grateful for this opportunity to study. All are extremely courteous, particularly the issei> Ingrained with the old Japanese training of respect toward a teacher, respect which is symbolized in an old proverb which cautions one to walk three feet behind a teacher so that one does not even walk upon the teacher's shadow, they often embarrass a young nisei teacher with their beautiful manners. As one young woman puts it,. "It's rather awkward to be greeted in the washroom with a very deep bow when one has ones hair in curlers and has just finished rubbing in cold cream on one's face," The method used is the direct one. There is no painful word for word translation from English to Japanese or vice-versa. Instead, whole phrases and related vocabularies are taught at one time. The whole motif is practical. The teachers have found that some of their pupils know a surprising number of words but don't know how to use them or write them
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 027_pg25.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341472
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341472