pg35

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Title TREK
Subject Internment of Japanese Americans, 1942-1945; Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation, 1942-1945
Description Newspaper published by the internees at Topaz Japanese Internment Camp.
Date 1943-02
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Digitization Specifications Scanned and OCR'd by a colleague of Jane Beckwith. University of Utah received JPEG images approximately 700x900 pixels with associated text files.
Source Original journal: TREK
Contributing Institution Topaz Museum, PO Box 241, Delta, Utah 84624
Language eng
Rights Management Digital version, copyright 2004 Topaz Museum. All rights reserved.
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2004-09-03
ID 341494
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj

Page Metadata

Title pg35
Description Most people have heard of Bonneville Flat. Before the days of tire and gas rationing, it was the mecca of car sharps, who were periodically out there trying to set a speed or an endurance record for either glory, gold, or Gil-more. .The roar of the motors, combined with the roar of the presses, boosted Bonneville Flat to national prominence. However, the publicity on Lake Bonneville, which formed the remarkably flat salt bed, has been notably meager. As far as the records show, no Pleistocene news-hawk pounded out a word of copy a-bout it. What we kno\M of the history of Lake Bonneville today is based on the evidence of deltas, shore terraces, sedimentation, and other geological factors. But even without an eyewitness-account, the ups and downs of the lake make a fascinating story. To picture the extent of Lake Bonneville during its prime, imagine the level of Great Salt Lake rising 1000 feet. Most of Utah would be submerged; Topaz would be under 600 feet of water; the Mormon Temple in Salt Lake City, under 850 feet. The length of this vast Pleistocene lake extended from Cache Bay to the south end of Escalante Bay, a distance of 346 miles. Its extreme width, from the mouth of Spanish Fork Canyon to a point on tho Shoshono Range near Dondon Pass, measured 145 miles. Its coastline, exclusive of islands, was 2550 miles; and its surface area was 19,750 square miles-only a few hundred miles less than Lake Michigan. At this level, 1000 feet above Great Salt Lake and 5200 feet above sea lovcl, the Bonneville waves cut terraces into the surrounding cliffs.-1- During the time the xiiaves were carving the shoreline, the level of the lake was relatively stable, remaining within a vertical range of 20 feet. Though it oscillated close to a pass in the rim of the basin, there was no danger of overflow so long as the inflow and the evaporation were nearly equal. But one season they weren't equal. The tributary streams brought in far more water than evaporation could accommodate, and gradually the level of the lake rose. A trickle of water overflowed through Red Rock Pass, in the northern end of Cache Valley. It wasn't a trickle for long. The stream eroded the loose earth of the rim; and as the size of the channel increased, the volume of the escaping water became greater, further accelerating the erosion. Soon a torrent was racing out of the basin, pouring through March Creek Valley in Idaho and joining the Porneuf River. From there the water flowed through Porneuf Pass to the valley of the Snake River, and from there to the Pacific. No one knows for certain how great the flow was. But geologists, after noting the scale of the carvings on the rocks around the pass, estimate that the average depth of the river xvas 20 feet- enough to discharge the flood volume of the Missouri. -'-One geologist (Peale) reported evidence of a water level from 300 to 600 feet above the Bonneville shoreline, or 5500 to 5800 feet above the sea; however no other scientist has con-, firmed this observation. 35
Format application/pdf
Resource Identifier 037_pg35.jpg
Source Original journal: TREK
Setname tc_tm
Date Created 2004-09-03
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 341482
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vh5mtj/341482