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Declaration of Independence_page_001

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Title (1866) Acts, Resolutions and Memorials, Passed at the Several Annual Sessions of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah, 1866
Subject Law
Description (1866) The Fifteenth Legislature, 1865, passed an act to print the laws as prepared and reported by the Joint Committee on Revision and Compilation, including laws of the current session. No 1865 session law was printed because these acts were incorporated into the 1866 compilation.
Publisher Legislative Assemblye of the State of Utah
Date 1866
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications Photocopies scanned with Epson Expression 1640 XL and saved as 400 ppi uncompressed TIFF's. Display JPEG's created in PhotoshopCS at 800 x 1125 ppi
Identifier KFU30 1866 .A193
Language eng
Rights Management Digital image copyright 2005, S.J. Quinney College of Law. All rights reserved
Holding Institution S.J. Quinney College of Law, The University of Utah, South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT
Source Physical Dimensions 15 cm x 23.5cm
Metadata Cataloger Kelly Taylor
Scanning Technician Amanda Wilson
ARK ark:/87278/s6w37x2b
Setname uu_law_uschs
Date Created 2005-11-15
Date Modified 2006-01-25
ID 717212
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6w37x2b

Page Metadata

Title Declaration of Independence_page_001
Description to'1 ¦¦¦'¦¦; i .' ¦¦¦•• DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. THE UNANIMOUS DECLARATION OF THE THIRTEEN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN CONGRESS ASSEMBLED. When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and of nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions, of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain ml alienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that, to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed; that, whenever any form of government, becomes destructive of these ends, it is the •right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and, accordingly, all experience hath shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to .Tyhich they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards for their future security. Such has been the patient sufferance of these colonies, and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter then-former system of government. The history of the present king of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having indirect object the establishment of an absolute tyranny over these States. To prove this, let facts be submitted to a candid world:- - - _ ' He has refused his assent to laws the moat'wholesome and necessary to the public •good. " '¦ ' " He has forbidden his governors to pass,laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his assent should be obtained; and, when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them. He has refused to pass other laws for the accommodation of large-districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of representation in the legislature-a right inestimable to them, and formidable to tyrants only. '¦.',. He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the.repository of their public records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing .them into compliance withihis measures* He has dissolved representative houses repeatedly for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people. .'•-. He has refused, for a.long time after such dissolutions, to cause others to be .elected; whereby the legislative powers, incapable of annihilation, have returned to the people at large for their exercise-the State remaining, in the meantime, exposed to all .the dangers of invasion from without and convulsions within. '''¦¦•• He has endeavored to prevent the population of these States-for that purpose obstructing the laws for naturalization, of foreigners, refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hither, and raising the conditions of new appropriations of lands.
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 008_Declaration of Independence_page_001.jpg
Source Original Book: Acts, Resolutions and Memorials, Passed at the Several Annual Sessions of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah, 1866
Setname uu_law_uschs
Date Created 2005-11-15
Date Modified 2005-11-15
ID 716962
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6w37x2b/716962