Contents

A Day at School

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 14
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1982
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6wh2n45
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 325496
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6wh2n45

Page Metadata

Title A Day at School
Description up the steps to the second and third floors, the boys up the north stairway, the girls up the south, keeping perfect step with the march played on the piano by one of the teachers, usually Lydia Hasler. I was quite startled to see a boy snatch-ed out of line for a misstep. He was soon joined by others, and the "awkward squad" was formed. This "squad " was marched up and down the stairs till a perfect march rhythm was reached, even those like Mabel Porter who had handicaps. There was no compassion for the under-developed or the handicapped! The practice of cadenced marching was later abandoned out of fear for the safety of the building as the rhythmic marching by so many students literally made the building sway. How I loved first grade as I learned the letters of the alphabet and the numbers as we wrote then on our slates! Near the end of the first year we could read from the primer, such a beautiful book with pictures of colored leaves-oak and maple; such a thrill to be able to read their names! I remem-ber, too, the spider on an inside page of the book. The first time I saw it, it startled me. After that, as I neared the part of the book where I remembered the spider picture to be, I gingerly turned each leaf by the merest comer until I had passed the fearsome spider! The ringing of the school bell soon became part of our lives. At 8:00 a.m. sharp the bell rang. "Old Man" Ellertson always had this job. He would stand with his great silver watch in his hand till the exact minute, then pull the bell ropes with all his strength; again at 8:15 a.m. so we were well warned of the approaching school hour. At 9:00 p.m. he also rang a curfew. We kids knew it was time to quit our game of "kick the can" or stealing apples and get for home or the marshall would get us! During the school day a "hall monitor" was chosen from the sixth graders. The monitor usually had a book to read or lessons to do while tending the bell. Watching the huge clock just outside the classroom across the hall from the bell rope (for the small gong inside the school building), the monitor rang bells signaling the end of one "period" or the beginning of another. A typical day began with a song, such as "Up, Up in the Sky " or "Good Mother Hen Sits Here on Her Nest." As we pro-gressed to higher grades, we sang "America," "The Old Oaken Bucket," "Old Folks at Home," or such. Prayer always followed this opening song. In the first grade it was usually offered by the teacher, in later grades by a student. Frequently there -119-
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 133_A Day at School.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 14
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-19
Date Modified 2005-02-19
ID 325343
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6wh2n45/325343