Contents

They Loved the Bikuben

Update item information
Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 14
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1982
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6wh2n45
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 325496
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6wh2n45

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Title They Loved the Bikuben
Description THEY LOVED THE BIKUBEN Janes L. Jacobs 1052 Darling Street Ogden, UT 844O3 Senior Citizen Division Second Place Anecdote The Bikuben Club set every Thursday in the lobby of the Mt. Pleasant Post Office during the 1920's. These were the older Danish immigrants who never learned to read English or who preferred to read the news in THE BIKUBEN, their own Danish language weekly newspaper which came in Thursday's mail. They loved this newspaper and were always there to get it promptly every Thursday. The club included Charley Shoemaker (Charles C. E. Peter-sen), Chris Cottonwood (Christian Rasmussen), Pete Poker {Peter H. Jensen), and others. They visited while the incoming mail was being sorted. As soon as the general delivery win-dow was opened, one of them came to the window and asked, "Ska da Bikuben heah? " When his Bikuben was handed to him, his face lighted up with a happy smile. About 50 subscribers lived in Mt. Pleasant at that time. The Bikuben was published in Salt Lake City by the L. D. S. Church for more than 59 years for the benefit of its Danish converts. When the Danes passed on and the subscription list dwindled, publication was suspended in 1935. I never knew what Bikuben meant. In downtown Copenhagen I was amazed to find on a large building a sign BIKUBEN with an old style beehive at each end of the sign similar to the one on the masthead of the Bikuben newspaper and the seal of the State of Utah. I went inside and found that this was a large bank and that Bikuben means beehive or bee cabin. This is a symbol of industry in both Denmark and Utah. Then I realized why the newspaper had been named Bikuben. Back in Mt. Pleasant I talked with families of former Bikuben subscribers. All of them remembered the newspaper, but no one I found knew that Bikuben means beehive. Source: Early Utah Journalism by J. Cecil Alter Personal recollections of the author. -90-
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 104_They Loved the Bikuben.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 14
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-19
Date Modified 2005-02-19
ID 325333
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6wh2n45/325333