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Title GENE is out of the Bottle, The
Description The 55th Annual Frederick William Reynolds Lecture.
Creator Gesteland, Raymond F.
Publisher University of Utah
Date 1995-11-07
Date Digital 2008-05-29
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications Original scanned on Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner and saved as 400 ppi uncompressed tiff. Display images generated in PhotoshopCS and uploaded into CONTENTdm Aquisition Station.
Language eng
Relation Is part of: Annual Frederick William Reynolds lecture
Rights Digital Image Copyright University of Utah
Metadata Cataloger Seungkeol Choe
ARK ark:/87278/s6mk69v5
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320758
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5

Page Metadata

Title Page 21
Description late-onset disease such as Huntington's chorea, a devastating neurological disease that has no available therapy but allows a normal life until age 50? Do you want to know before you make reproductive choices? Do you want to know that you have predisposition to breast cancer? If you have a genetic predisposition, do you have an obligation to tell your siblings? Maybe they don't want to know. These are difficult issues. The congressional mandate for the genome project allocated 3% (now 5%) of the genome funds to support research on ethical, legal and social issues, to try to anticipate problems arising from the new genetics. Projects are ongoing here and in other places, to assess the results of genetic counseling. Efforts are underway to formulate public policies with respect to issues of insurance and privacy. Conclusion Is the genome project a good investment? You will be the judge. From a biological viewpoint, the value will lie in the wealth of information about evolution of genes and organisms. From a medical viewpoint, the greatest value will not be fancy gene therapies based on DNA-corrective medicine, but rather the thorough biological understanding that comes from knowing what all those genes are doing. Therapies specific for biochemical problems can then be designed and invoked early in the course of disease. With all this knowledge comes responsibility. What is the responsibility of the scientific community? Knowledge will be gained in any case; the public policy of funding science only determines the rate at which the knowledge is gained. However, that does not absolve scientists from all responsibility. Scientists are, with rare exceptions, not well trained for formulating public policy. Their obligation rather is to do what they are supposed to be good at - educating. It is their job to make sure that policy makers, ethicists, social scientists, and lawyers - and the public at large, are cleanly informed about the current state of science: to explain the power of the genie â€" not to make the wishes. The revolution has happened. The genie is out of the bottle. The genie has been empowered. New information is coming in real time. We can't turn it back. It's an exciting era that is bringing new medical paradigms and incredible opportunities to understand biology and evolution. It is exciting to be part of the revolution but we the revolutionaries will have to figure out how to cope with victory.
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 021-RNLT-GestelandRE_Page 21.jpg
Source Original Manuscript: The GENE is out of the bottle by Raymond F. Gesteland.
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320755
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5/320755