Page 16

Update item information
Title GENE is out of the Bottle, The
Description The 55th Annual Frederick William Reynolds Lecture.
Creator Gesteland, Raymond F.
Publisher University of Utah
Date 1995-11-07
Date Digital 2008-05-29
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications Original scanned on Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner and saved as 400 ppi uncompressed tiff. Display images generated in PhotoshopCS and uploaded into CONTENTdm Aquisition Station.
Language eng
Relation Is part of: Annual Frederick William Reynolds lecture
Rights Digital Image Copyright University of Utah
Metadata Cataloger Seungkeol Choe
ARK ark:/87278/s6mk69v5
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320758
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5

Page Metadata

Title Page 16
Description Model organisms contribute to our understanding of the human in many ways. Jerry Rubin makes the argument, quite convincingly, that if some new human gene can be shown to have homology with genes in Drosophila and C. elegans, very likely the function of that gene in a human is going to be the same as in these model organisms. Genetic and biochemical experiments can be done readily in the fly and the worm to define the function of the protein product of a gene. With the inference that the homologous gene in humans is doing the same thing, very directed experiments can be designed to test that hypothesis. So there is enormous value in studying genomes of model organisms, not just to understand the biology of these organisms, but also to extend that information to understanding what's going on in humans. The Next Challenge: Network of Qene Interactions The genetic blueprint defines gene products that through their biochemical functions and interactions constitute a developing, replicating organism that responds to its environment. Some of the gene products make cell structures, others convert energy to useful forms for the cell, still others control the timing and extent of expression of other sets of genes. It is the interactions among these gene products in space and time that define the functioning organism. To understand the human organism we must understand the interactions of this massive array, 100,000 genes that makeup the parts list. By their sequences we can begin to organize them, maybe arraying them in one dimension according to gene type - energy metabolism, regulation, DNA replication, protein synthesis, etc.. Then in a second dimension, the related family members of these types could be displayed according to relatedness of protein sequences. Within this two dimensional array we could imagine connecting lines between the members to describe the interactions among all â€" a very complex network. Onto this must be mapped the time dimension, including time of expression during development and time of expression during environmental stimuli. However, the actual chemistry of the gene products may also be time-dependent, as proteins are modified by biochemical processes and these modifications undoubtedly alter the paths of interaction. The complexity quickly becomes overwhelming. Even with the limited set of human genes that we now know, the complexities of pathways of metabolism, signal transduction, gene regulation, and development are challenging. When the complete cast of characters emerges from the genome project, how will the whole be reassembled? One analogy might come from something more familiar, the automobile. Cars are complex - a few thousand parts, many related - belonging to "parts families" such as bolts of different sizes and different threads, or gears of different diameters and number of teeth. Imagine that you go to a car rally
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 016-RNLT-GestelandRE_Page 16.jpg
Source Original Manuscript: The GENE is out of the bottle by Raymond F. Gesteland.
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320750
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5/320750