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Title GENE is out of the Bottle, The
Description The 55th Annual Frederick William Reynolds Lecture.
Creator Gesteland, Raymond F.
Publisher University of Utah
Date 1995-11-07
Date Digital 2008-05-29
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications Original scanned on Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner and saved as 400 ppi uncompressed tiff. Display images generated in PhotoshopCS and uploaded into CONTENTdm Aquisition Station.
Language eng
Relation Is part of: Annual Frederick William Reynolds lecture
Rights Digital Image Copyright University of Utah
Metadata Cataloger Seungkeol Choe
ARK ark:/87278/s6mk69v5
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320758
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5

Page Metadata

Title Page 9
Description is its simplicity. Though running the machines is very labor intensive, at least picking random fragments for feed is easy. There are claims that by recent advances in the throughput of these machines and addition of other automation, the cost can be driven down to 50 cents a base, but for most people, that's still too expensive. You might commit the resources to sequence the human genome once, but you would still be far from the goal of having efficient sequencing techniques for the decades ahead. In short, we presently have technology that will get us by, but it's not a good enough solution for the future of biology. That's why I think that the technology development is so vital. In the interim, sequencing is moving ahead on moderate-size genomes and two microorganisms have been completely sequenced. These spectacular achievements include the sequences for Hemophilus influenzae and Mycoplasma genitalia. The first, H. influenzae, was done in less than one year by Ham Smith and Craig Ventor in a commercial (but not for profit) setting by throwing 30 machines at the problem and employing a bevy of highly trained technicians. The sequences are now in public data bases for all to peruse and they are fascinating. You can just call the TIGR World Wide Web site and there it is â€" sequence, genes and all. The H. influenzae genome is a single, circular piece of DNA of 1,830,137 bases, about 2,000 times smaller than the total human genome. The sequences allow prediction of 1727 genes. The second complete genome sequenced was Mycoplasma genitalia, with the smallest genome known for a free-living organism. It has only 580,070 bases with 470 identifiable genes. These two genome sequences are being attacked with great delight by the piranhas of the genetics world and it is clear that much will be unveiled about the information needs of cells. Acquisition of the sequences is just scratching the surface. Spurred on by these successes, the sequences of a number of other microorganisms will be completed within the next two years, including E. Coli, which has lagged embarrassingly behind. Yeast, another model organism, has a more complex life style than bacteria: two mating types, two developmental states and a genome size of 12 megabases - 3 times the size of E. Coli. A European consortium, Euro Yeast, has used a cottage-industry approach to sequence most of the yeast genome and they, together with some U.S. labs, probably will finish this monumental feat by sometime next year. This project is an interesting model of community cooperation. A central organizing group parcels out bits of chromosomes to 30 dif
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 009-RNLT-GestelandRE_Page 9.jpg
Source Original Manuscript: The GENE is out of the bottle by Raymond F. Gesteland.
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320743
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5/320743