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Title GENE is out of the Bottle, The
Description The 55th Annual Frederick William Reynolds Lecture.
Creator Gesteland, Raymond F.
Publisher University of Utah
Date 1995-11-07
Date Digital 2008-05-29
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications Original scanned on Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner and saved as 400 ppi uncompressed tiff. Display images generated in PhotoshopCS and uploaded into CONTENTdm Aquisition Station.
Language eng
Relation Is part of: Annual Frederick William Reynolds lecture
Rights Digital Image Copyright University of Utah
Metadata Cataloger Seungkeol Choe
ARK ark:/87278/s6mk69v5
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320758
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5

Page Metadata

Title Page 4
Description What makes the idea of sequencing the human genome so compelling? Is it even possible? The debate goes on. Critics complain that the project represents "big science" and that big science is bad. For most of its history the molecular biology community has thrived on hypothesis testing and technology development that were born out of the melting pot of individual initiative. The only precedent of goal-oriented initiatives was the "war on cancer" which was derided as less than successful at the time, but in retrospect did set the stage for our current understanding of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Critics said that the cost of the genome project is too high and that it takes funding away from conventional and historically successful research. Others say that the sequence will not be all that valuable anyway since 95% of the human sequence is "junk" DNA. Some are deeply concerned over the ethical and social issues that genetic information raises. Supporters of the genome project argue that the investment is cheap at the price - after all, genetic information will be the basis for future biomedical research, and will revolutionize medicine. Sequence information will be obtained one way or another and a large fraction of current research money to individual laboratories goes into finding and sequencing a gene of interest so that the interesting questions about its physiological functions and malfunctions can be asked. So this "big science" is a great stimulus for small science. And there is also is a sense that technological advances will fuel the next revolution - the increasing enlightenment as to how genes interact during development to make an organism. The 1995 Nobel Prize for Medicine went to three scientists who used formal, genetic approaches to help set the stage for understanding how organisms develop. Do we know who is right? Five years into the genome project we can see specific, useful progress, but, some would argue that the jury is still out on the long-term value. The genome project was a radical, even arrogant, idea at its inception and it remains so today. Origins The evolution of science policy is curious. Some have called the Genome Project "the Manhattan Project of Biology" - a concerted, goal oriented program to build a new resource. Ironically, the origins of the Human Genome Project were directly tied to the Manhattan Project. At Alta, Utah in 1984, the Department of Energy assembled a small group of scientists for the express purpose of finding a way to
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 004-RNLT-GestelandRE_Page 4.jpg
Source Original Manuscript: The GENE is out of the bottle by Raymond F. Gesteland.
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320738
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5/320738