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Title GENE is out of the Bottle, The
Description The 55th Annual Frederick William Reynolds Lecture.
Creator Gesteland, Raymond F.
Publisher University of Utah
Date 1995-11-07
Date Digital 2008-05-29
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications Original scanned on Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner and saved as 400 ppi uncompressed tiff. Display images generated in PhotoshopCS and uploaded into CONTENTdm Aquisition Station.
Language eng
Relation Is part of: Annual Frederick William Reynolds lecture
Rights Digital Image Copyright University of Utah
Metadata Cataloger Seungkeol Choe
ARK ark:/87278/s6mk69v5
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320758
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5

Page Metadata

Title Page 10
Description ferent laboratories in Europe and the sequence information comes back to the central data base. (Though this model works for yeast it will not scale for the human sequence with its 500 fold greater complexity. It is also not at all clear that any measure of cooperation could be engendered in work with human sequencing. The stakes are just too high). The Euro Yeast community has also put in place a very clever, systematic way of identifying which proteins in the yeast cell come from which gene. We already know this for some of the genes but the method works for many of the unknown ones. The proteins from yeast cells can be fractionated a two-dimensional way based on size and charge. Each of the few thousand visible proteins is punched out and each gives a unique signature of the mass of specific fragments of the protein. Predicted signatures can also be calculated from each gene whose DNA sequence is present in the data bank, so the corresponding gene can be identified if the signatures match. Yeast will certainly be the first complex genome to be fully sequenced. Already there are many tantalizing similarities between yeast genes and human genes. A different model for sequencing organization is used by the "worm community". Bob Waterson in St. Louis and John Sulstun in Cambridge, England have a long standing 50/50 collaboration on mapping and sequencing the 100-megabase genome of the nematode, C. elegans. This project is going along at a very rapid rate and will likely be done by the year 2000. This worm has 1489 cells with a complicated developmental program that has been very well worked out. The origins and fates of each of these cells are known, which led to the realization that certain cells are programmed to die during development. "Programmed cell death", or apoptosis, is now under intensive study in many organisms including man. Another model system, Drosophila (fruit fly), is being sequenced through a center at Berkeley run by Jerry Rubin. This 150-megabase genome may not be finished until 2005, but will have enormous value since the fruit fly has long been the mainstay for developmental geneticists. A very elegant bag of genetic tricks led to experiments producing bizarre flies with 4 eyes, or legs in place of antennae, or missing body segments. The genes involved turned out to be key players in developmental decisions. When mutated, the wrong decisions are made, giving rearranged flies. These genes have ho-mologs in humans that play crucial roles in development. A complete catalog of gene sequences for the fly will greatly increase our understanding of development and ultimately will produce valuable information about human development and birth defects. Human sequencing has a long way to go. The data base has less than 50 million bases of chromosomal information and most of these are
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 010-RNLT-GestelandRE_Page 10.jpg
Source Original Manuscript: The GENE is out of the bottle by Raymond F. Gesteland.
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320744
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5/320744