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Title GENE is out of the Bottle, The
Description The 55th Annual Frederick William Reynolds Lecture.
Creator Gesteland, Raymond F.
Publisher University of Utah
Date 1995-11-07
Date Digital 2008-05-29
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications Original scanned on Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner and saved as 400 ppi uncompressed tiff. Display images generated in PhotoshopCS and uploaded into CONTENTdm Aquisition Station.
Language eng
Relation Is part of: Annual Frederick William Reynolds lecture
Rights Digital Image Copyright University of Utah
Metadata Cataloger Seungkeol Choe
ARK ark:/87278/s6mk69v5
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320758
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5

Page Metadata

Title Page 19
Description least for bacteria, yeast, fly and worm, systematic and efficient methods are being developed. Qenetic Complexity Man has some 100,000 genes; 25 times as many genes as E. coli or 4 times as many as the fruit fly. What accounts for this greater complexity? Are most of the genes added during the course of evolution of man, genes that are unique in humans? From the small amount of information available so far the answer is probably no. Evolution operates not by sudden emergence of a new gene but rather by variant genes with new functions arising from existing ones. For instance, a gene might duplicate by chance during replication of the chromosome so there are now two copies (or four in a diploid organism). One copy continues to provide the original function but the new copy is free to evolve through a series of individual, random changes in sequence to some new but probably related function that becomes important to the organism. Many cycles of duplication and evolution result in a family of genes with recognizable similarity in sequences but different biological functions. Comparison of human genomic sequences with those of lower organisms suggests that much of the added gene complexity in the human comes from the emergence of large gene families. The homeobox genes provide a clear example of this phenomenon. Therefore, it is likely that the human genome sequence will reveal more adaptations of existing kinds of genes than completely new ones. But the cleverness of the adaptations will be intriguing. They are the heart of evolution. A Qlimpse of the Future Genes involved in monogenic inherited disorders are being described at a fast pace - just pick up the Tuesday New York Times. But only a a few thousand genes are targets for the single cause of a disease. Most common diseases that have an inherited component are mul-tigenic - they involve damage to many different genes. These molecular defects are harder to pin down, but knowledge emerging from the genome project will make it increasingly easier. With a candidate gene in hand it is not too hard to look through a large family with an inherited predisposition and see if that gene is defective in the affected members. At the moment finding the appropriate candidate genes is a frustrating, slow process. But the rewards of identifying the aberrant sequence of a disease-causing gene are great, especially when treatment is available. One striking example of the role DN A approaches can play in modern medicine happened here at the Eccles Institute. Cardiologist Mark Keating saw patients with long QT syndrome, an inherited
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 019-RNLT-GestelandRE_Page 19.jpg
Source Original Manuscript: The GENE is out of the bottle by Raymond F. Gesteland.
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320753
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5/320753