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Title GENE is out of the Bottle, The
Description The 55th Annual Frederick William Reynolds Lecture.
Creator Gesteland, Raymond F.
Publisher University of Utah
Date 1995-11-07
Date Digital 2008-05-29
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications Original scanned on Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner and saved as 400 ppi uncompressed tiff. Display images generated in PhotoshopCS and uploaded into CONTENTdm Aquisition Station.
Language eng
Relation Is part of: Annual Frederick William Reynolds lecture
Rights Digital Image Copyright University of Utah
Metadata Cataloger Seungkeol Choe
ARK ark:/87278/s6mk69v5
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320758
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5

Page Metadata

Title Page 15
Description 30 times to achieve geometric amplification of the region. With the whole genome sequence in hand any region can be amplified for study. So it is now almost trivial to compare one region in 1000 people or 100 regions in fifty people. In fact it is this technology that helps to set the accuracy limits for a reference DNA sequence â€" in the extreme it only really needs to be good enough to be able to reliably predict primers that will work. Sequence Variation Sibs 1/2000 Unrelated People 1/500 Chimps 1/60 Mouse 1/30 Spinach 2/3 We have a general idea about variation of DNA sequence among human populations, but specific details are lacking. Identical twins have virtually identical sequences. Siblings differ by 1/2000, a statistic which provides the basis for family studies to follow the inheritance of a disease trait and map its chromosomal location. Unrelated humans differ by one base in every 500, which translates to 6 million differences in the 3 billion-base genome. It is these sequence differences that account for all the inherited phenotypic differences between us and that are the basis for DNA forensics. (Since 1/500 bases are different between any two people, there may be little point in having an accuracy much greater than this). How this variation is spread over the genome is not clear. Large-scale sequence comparisons among people will be very revealing. Sequence comparisons will be very powerful for probing complex genetic diseases that involve many genes. Qene Function Once the encyclopedia of human DNA is complete, it will have some 100,000 genes embedded in the 3 billion-base genome. How do we find the genes and their functions? A powerful approach to finding genes is by comparison of sequences among different species. Functional sequences, genes, are highly conserved through evolution while other regions have diverged considerably. Comparisons often also assign functions.
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 015-RNLT-GestelandRE_Page 15.jpg
Source Original Manuscript: The GENE is out of the bottle by Raymond F. Gesteland.
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320749
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5/320749