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Title GENE is out of the Bottle, The
Description The 55th Annual Frederick William Reynolds Lecture.
Creator Gesteland, Raymond F.
Publisher University of Utah
Date 1995-11-07
Date Digital 2008-05-29
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications Original scanned on Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner and saved as 400 ppi uncompressed tiff. Display images generated in PhotoshopCS and uploaded into CONTENTdm Aquisition Station.
Language eng
Relation Is part of: Annual Frederick William Reynolds lecture
Rights Digital Image Copyright University of Utah
Metadata Cataloger Seungkeol Choe
ARK ark:/87278/s6mk69v5
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320758
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5

Page Metadata

Title Page 14
Description Archaebacteria, typified by Pyrococcus, is by some measures, evolu-tionarily as distant from the Eubacteria and from the human as E. coli is from the human. Microorganisms are also interesting because they occupy an amazing variety of ecological niches. Pyococcus grows at 10°C â€" above the temperature of boiling water. Halophilic bacteria require very high salt concentrations. Others require acidic conditions that would burn your hand. Still others require the very high pressures that they experience in their deep-sea homes. What evolutionary adaptations have allowed survival under these seemingly nonbiological conditions? Genes will tell a rich part of that story. Is each gene designed a little differently to accommodate to the conditions? Are there whole new functions that aid the cell in dealing with its environment? We know bits and pieces of these answers from directed studies, but nothing will compare to having the gene catalog in front of us. There is also great commercial interest in genes from organisms that withstand harsh conditions, because the proteins they encode have unusual stability that makes them especially useful for industrial enzymatic syntheses. Another whole group of microorganisms are of interest because of their pathogenicity. The genomes of Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochete that causes Lyme disease, Neisseria gonorrheae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and others are being sequenced with the hope that an understanding of their genes that promote disease may reveal opportunities for intervention. Whatever the motivation for sequencing, we can be assured of gaining a very rich view of the evolutionary relationships among these organisms and, by comparing them, we can learn what key genetic elements are required by free living, simple organisms in many environments. So even where the lowly microorganisms are concerned the groundswell of desire for genomic sequence information is unstoppable. Sequence Variation Once diverse genomes have been sequenced, emphasis will switch to detailed sequence comparisons for it is the natural variation of genome sequences in populations that provide the grist for the mill of evolution and the mutations that cause inherited diseases. A powerful new technology has enormously changed research in this area. The polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, is a simple technique that allows million fold amplification of any DN A sequence as long as you know the sequence of a couple dozen bases on either side of the region of interest. Two DN A "primers" corresponding to the two flanking sequences, and a polymerizing enzyme, can be cycled 20 or
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 014-RNLT-GestelandRE_Page 14.jpg
Source Original Manuscript: The GENE is out of the bottle by Raymond F. Gesteland.
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320748
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5/320748