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Title GENE is out of the Bottle, The
Description The 55th Annual Frederick William Reynolds Lecture.
Creator Gesteland, Raymond F.
Publisher University of Utah
Date 1995-11-07
Date Digital 2008-05-29
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications Original scanned on Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner and saved as 400 ppi uncompressed tiff. Display images generated in PhotoshopCS and uploaded into CONTENTdm Aquisition Station.
Language eng
Relation Is part of: Annual Frederick William Reynolds lecture
Rights Digital Image Copyright University of Utah
Metadata Cataloger Seungkeol Choe
ARK ark:/87278/s6mk69v5
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320758
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5

Page Metadata

Title Page 20
Description condition that makes its carriers subject to fatal heart attacks under stress, usually when they are young. By studying families, Dr. Keating the clinician, as Dr. Keating the researcher, mapped the chromosmal locales for three different genes that when defective can predispose to this condition. After painstaking work his team isolated the genes. The sequences showed that they encode proteins involved in gating ions in and out of cardiac cells - crucial to correct contractions. In the lab next door Mike Sanguenetti, studying the electrophysiology of cardiac cells, looked at cells showing the defect in ion channels and realized that existing drugs capable of altering channel behavior could correct the defect. In 14 months the team went from an affected family to defective genes to a potential, conventional therapy based on the gene. We will see more and more of this kind of success as the pace quickens. Dilemmas The genetics revolution â€" the empowered genie - raises challenging dilemmas. With identification of all the genes involved in key life processes, I can imagine that ten years from now you might enter a 7/11 convenience store and donate a drop of your blood. Ten minutes later a computer prints out your genetic predisposition to the top 50 human diseases. This summary indicates that your chances of getting disease X by age 50 are 3.5 times the national average, and that you have a 23 percent likelihood of getting disease Y in your lifetime. What do you do? Does it tell you how the odds change if you modify your lifestyle? If you stop smoking... if you eat brussels sprouts... maybe the machine even spits out a magnetic card that when inserted in a machine at the pharmacy specifies your prescriptions, or at Dan's automatically purchases what you should eat and at your health club programs the weight machines. Though this may sound absurd, knowing about these predispositions might be helpful if changes in lifestyle will improve your health â€" you might want to know. But obvious problems loom. Interpreting the numbers will not be simple. Guidance by a well trained health-care provider will be essential, but such specialists will be hard to find. Another problem is that others might also want to know your genetic secrets, such as your insurance agent or your employer. And once you know, you can no longer check the "no preconditions" box on the insurance application. Spurred by this onslaught of new information, some states are moving forward with legislation that would ban discrimination based on genetic data. The ethical and social issues become ever more complicated. Do you want to know if you have a mutation that predisposes you to a
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 020-RNLT-GestelandRE_Page 20.jpg
Source Original Manuscript: The GENE is out of the bottle by Raymond F. Gesteland.
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 320754
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6mk69v5/320754