Contents

The Armory Hall as I Remember It

Update item information
Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 18
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1986
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6n014pd
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 325758
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6n014pd

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Title The Armory Hall as I Remember It
Description After the Armory Hall was built, Mt, Pleasant became a dance-oriented town, to a great extent. And did we dance! On November 11, 1919, I wrote in my diary; "I must go and press my new blue dress because tonight is the big Armistice Ball in the Armory -" "Armistice is a thrilling day. We celebrate in style. A year ago we made them pay And Fritzie ran a mile." Here is another entry, dated December 28, 1919, "What a terrific holiday season we have just had. I went to nine dances in succession, with the exception of Sunday." During the 'Teens and Twenties, dances were held almost every weekend. We had an excellent orchestra led by Henry Terry, Other members were George Squires, Ernest Staker, and Milton Ericksen; Gladys Ericksen (Seely), and later, Amber Hanford (Riddle) were the pianists„ They were popular players for most of our dances, and also in nearby towns. The special music for the young was "Rube & Dube," an out-of-town orchestra. When we knew they were coming, the dance was already a success. My favorite piece they played was "Tuck me to Sleep in my Old 'Tucky Home. The trombones blared, the saxophones wailed, the clarinets covered a wide range of pleasing notes, the bass drum reverberated with power, We fox-trotted, two-stepped, waltzed, pivoted on the corners, "charlied," and a few daring boys even "shimmied," The Turkey Trot had become passe' and jazz was the "in" thing--"Oh, let me give you a warning, we won't be home until morning. In the lovin' land of jazz." Paul Whiteman was the Jazz King of the hour. We were just plain lucky to have a multitude of catchy, exciting and fascinating tunes during those "dance years." Many are still played and savored--"Girl of My Dreams," "Whispering," "Oh, What a Pal Was Mary," "Sleep, Sleep, Sleep," and all of Irving Berlin's courting songs that he wrote 10 3
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 116_The Armory Hall as I Remember It.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 18
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-19
Date Modified 2005-02-19
ID 325725
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6n014pd/325725