Contents

Dancing Through the Hard Times

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 18
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1986
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6n014pd
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 325758
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6n014pd

Page Metadata

Title Dancing Through the Hard Times
Description across the floor to the melodious strains of a beautiful waltz or a snappy foxtrot. The polka was a delight because it was impossible for anyone to dance without a smile on their face. A lot of space was needed because they really moved in perfect time with favorites such as "Roll Out The Barrel" and "Pennsylvania Polka," Everyone's memories differ. Each person has a variety of things which make lasting impressions. I want to relate what my parents, Ewell and Nary Jensen Anderson, remember about dancing in the late 1920s and through the 1930s, Those were days of the great depression and times were hard, but dancing helped them get through it. In Sanpete County almost every town had its own dance hall, but the "Old Bungalow" in Moroni seemed to be everyone's favorite and always drew a large crowd. Students from Fountain Green, Freedom, Moroni, Wales, Chester, and Jerusalem all went to high school at Moroni High. They took special interest in the town dance hall, located on Main Street at the east end of the business district. The school hosted dances after the ballgames, but any special dance such as a Junior Prom was held at the "Bungalow." Everyone looked forward to weekends. There was a dance every single Saturday night and on every other occasion that could possibly be used as an excuse. Any holiday, or even an election day eve, would find a goodly number of townspeople down at the dance. Dancers shuffled through sprinkles of sawdust which made the whirling and twirling easier. Often the hall was decorated with crepe paper streamers draped across the ceiling and twisted about the stage where the dance band was grouped. Local talent always provided the music, Most towns had their own dance band but one of Sanpete's favorites was a group who called themselves "The Revelers" (meaning to take great pleasure or delight, merrymaking or noisy festivity with dancing). They made fantastic musical sounds and never seemed to tire of performing. Those who danced to the "Revelers'" music claimed they were every bit as good as the 79
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 092_Dancing Through the Hard Times.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 18
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-19
Date Modified 2005-02-19
ID 325681
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6n014pd/325681