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A Time for Growing Up

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 18
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1986
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6n014pd
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 325758
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6n014pd

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Title A Time for Growing Up
Description arrived, the young men of the town went willingly to work on a house for them, A dance would be in the offing for those who helped (These Our Fathers, P. 124). ------------------------ The town of Fairview had quite a reputation for holding good Saturday night dances. The popularity of the dance held until World War II, but the abrupt decline in favor since that time seems to be permanent. One of the earliest dance halls in Fairview was the old Eclipse Pavilion. The building served as dance hall and post office for many years. It was eventually replaced by the present dance hall that was built on the same site. Both buildings were just east of the Floyd Young Drugstore on Main Street. During the early years, dancing was a major social event. The Saturday night dance drew nearly everyone in the valley and as many came to watch as to participate. Dignity and grace were the order of the day, and the waltz was king. Jack Pearson used to boast that he could dance the waltz with a glass of water on top of his head without spilling a drop. The dances never got out of line because the hall was lined with spectators whose whispered conversations and pointing kept young men from holding the girls too close and thereby going down the road to moral decay. I must mention, however, that the bolder males were not above taking a drink or two before the dance in order to bolster the ego and gain enough courage to ask the girl who always seemed unapproachable. She was the one who was bound to be held closer ariid the whispering and pointing, I rather suspect, however, that all the girls enjoyed the holding close and the whispering. Besides, the bold swain was likely to throw caution to the wind after the dance and take the girl to the drugstore for an ice cream soda (Personal History of Golden G, Sanderson (1977), pp. 26-27). 123
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 136_A Time for Growing Up.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 18
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-19
Date Modified 2005-02-19
ID 325654
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6n014pd/325654