Contents

Memories, Mayfield, Sanpete County, Uath

Update item information
Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 18
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1986
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6n014pd
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 325758
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6n014pd

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Title Memories, Mayfield, Sanpete County, Uath
Description that its early settlers lived by the rules of the "United Order." The south part of Mayfield was called the "Other Side." Here I spent a very happy childhood, being raised by my grandmother, as my mother had died when I was very small, I attended school in the large, square, two-etdry brick building known as the Lincoln School. It had four large rooms with two grades in each room, thus making eight grades. A large bell, with a deep resonant tone, hung in the cupola or belfry. Its ringing called us to school in the mornings and dismissed us from school in the afternoon. It told us when it was time for recesses and noon. It was rung for curfew every night at nine by the town raarshall and all of us children knew it was then time to clear the streets and go home. This bell was also used to alert the town in case of a fire. Many times I have been awakened from my sleep by its wild pealing clamor, as it called the citizens to grab their empty buckets and form a "bucket brigade" in the h»pe that the fire could be put out before too much damage was done. Our rock church also had a bell, but it sounded different. It had a lighter, more shrill tone. It called us to worship every Sunday morning, and also to church meetings. It was here that the Mayfield folk held their dances and town parties. Another sound I remember was the whistle of the D, & R.G. train as it steamed into the Gunnison Depot. Its sound wafted clearly over the west hills. This made it possible to tell the time of day, and we set our clocks by its whistle. We always had "fun days as we celebrated the various holidays of the year, especially the Fourth and the Twenty-fourth of July. The preparations began days before, as parades, programs, children's dances, sports on the green, etc., were planned and scheduled. Always there was popcorn, candy, root beer, and other goodies with each little girl appearing in a brand-new dress. This she wore as "best" for the rest of the summer. 25
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 038_Memories, Mayfield, Sanpete County, Uath.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 18
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-19
Date Modified 2005-02-19
ID 325706
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6n014pd/325706