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Basket of Chips, page 096

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Identifier /tanner/image/basket_chips.xml
Title A Basket of Chips: An Autobiography
Creator Harwood, James Taylor, 1860-1940
Subject Artists; Painters; Artists' writings
Subject Local Harwood, James Taylor, 1860-1940; Artists--Utah--Biography; Harwood, Harriett Richards, (1870-1922)
Description These memoirs of Utah artist and teacher James T. Harwood cover a wide range of subjects including farming, gardening, bird watching and cooking. But, primarily, "A Basket of Chips" is about his early love, Harriett Richards, and their life together.
Publisher Tanner Trust Fund University of Utah Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
Contributors Olpin, Robert S.; Ward, Margery W.; Cooley, Everett L.; Madsen, Brigham D.; Tyler, S. Lyman
Date 1985
Type Text
Format image/png
Language eng
Relation Is part of: Utah, the Mormons, and the West, no. 12
Coverage 1860-1940
Rights Management University of Utah, Copyright 2001
Holding Institution J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah.
Source Physical Dimensions 14.5 cm x 22.75 cm
Source Characteristics Printed Hard Cover Book
Scanning Technician Karen Edge
Metadata Cataloger Kenning Arlitsch; Jan Robertson
Call Number N 6537 H364 A2 1985
ARK ark:/87278/s6zs2vsj
Topic Artists; Painters; First person narrative
Setname uum_ttb
Date Created 2005-04-20
Date Modified 2011-04-07
ID 327930
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6zs2vsj

Page Metadata

Identifier 118.gif
Title Basket of Chips, page 096
Description A BasRet of Chips long, sleepless nights; the whole thing lived over with all the regrets, - "if this or that had been done, all might have been different." Never could I utter a prayer of words; the very thoughts of it seemed childish. A moan of anguish; - that combined all the human soul could crave or ask for, was my nightly prayer. And to add the climax to my suffering, each morning at day- break the house-finches in our trees burst forth with the melo- dies of the spring mornings a year ago. "Shall I ever again be able to hear the song of the oriole without being pierced through and through? Can it ever be other than a dirge for the dead to me?" Day after day, week after week, this bird whistled and warbled in a mulberry by the door, while sorrow, like a pall, darkened my day. "Hearken to yon pine warbler, Singing aloft in the tree! Hearest thozl, 0 traveler! What be singetb to me? Not zlnless God made sharp thine em With sorrow sivch ds mine Ozlt Of that deliGate lay cozlldst thozl It's heavy tdle diuine." It will soon be a year now and my association with her dear relatives, my son and his wife and children, my children, my sister and niece, and most of all, my daughter Ruth, gives me hope and much to live for. She supports me spiritually. Her 12 John Burroughs's (1837-1921) prose are Wuke-Robin (IUS), Birds and Poets ( NV), Locusts and Wild Honey (1879)) Signs and Seasons (X386), and Ways of Nutwe (1905). Birds and Bough is his one volume of poems (1906). J. Burroughs, My Boyhood (Garden City, New York: Doubleday, Page & Co., 1922) and John Burrorcghs' Talks, His Reminiscences und Comments (Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1922). 96
Format image/png
Source A Basket of Chips: An Autobiography
Setname uum_ttb
Date Created 2005-04-14
Date Modified 2005-04-14
ID 327576
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6zs2vsj/327576