Contents

My Grandfather, Stemboat Olsen

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 27
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1995
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s60863fm
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 326335
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s60863fm

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Title My Grandfather, Stemboat Olsen
Description At the present time one of his hearses, which has been carefully restored, is on display in the Carriage Museum at Iron Mission Stale Park in Cedar Ciiy(7) There is also on display at the Fairview museum of History and Art, a replica, in minature by Lyndon Graham, of the hearse Grandfather sold to Hans Madsen of Fairview Grandfather's talents found expression in helping build both both the Manti and Salt Lake Temples He was one of the craftsmen who designed and built the trusses above the large priesthood room in the Manti Temple, patterned after the design of an inverted ship hull(3) When I was eight and went to the Temple for baptism. Mother told of her father walking the seven miles to and from Manti each day while he worked on the Temple. She also took me to see and feel the satin-like smoothness of the joints in the hand-rail that he had built for the spiral stairway To me, that experience was second only to seeing the gold oxen supporting the baptismal font Grandfather taught woodwork and drafting a! Snow Academy from 1895 to 1907(2) (3) During this same period, he expanded his career interests by homesteading a farm at the mouth of Willow Creek Canyon where he raised peaches and Italian Prunes which he sold in carload lots throughout the State Scandinavians are famous for their nick-names, many of which simply acknowledge superficial physical or personality traits. From an early age I had been aware that my grandfather was known as "Steamboat Olsen." I accepted it much as one speaks prose without necessarily knowing the definition of prose It was simply who he was His given name, Andreas, was only incidental and okay for genealogical records. Many in the community had no idea why a carpenter and farmer far from the sea was called "Steamboat" Some believed it was because he had traveled extensively by sea in coming from Norway and going to the Orient before arriving in Sanpete Others alleged that the name had originated from a proposal to build a boat to ply the Sanpitch river before it dried up But those close to him knew, and I learned, the real story behind his name when mother unlocked the door to his "Den" to show me what had been the business office and design center of his operations The "den" was a small room partitioned off from the main work shop There on the shelves and in a hand-made roll-top desk with a maze of cubby holes were his precise scale drawings and designs and his business ledgers in Grandmother's bold clear handwriting But, most important, here were the clues to an important driving force in his life and the reason for his nickname. On a specially constructed shelf over his desk was a model of a beautiful ocean liner and in a box inside an old steamer trunk was a prototype of the "machine" that was to power it An elaborate set of scale drawings was neatly folded on a shelf under the model. They showed many cross-sectional views with construction notes and specifications for a compartmentalized "unsinkable" hull A patent application with these papers as supporting documents is at present a part of the collection at the LDS Church Historical Museum in Salt Lake City(9). 20
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 030_My Grandfather, Stemboat Olsen.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch 27
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-23
Date Modified 2005-02-23
ID 326286
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s60863fm/326286