Contents

Remembering An Old Weathered Rope

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 16
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1984
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6j67f3x
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 324751
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6j67f3x

Page Metadata

Title Remembering An Old Weathered Rope
Description These Our Fathers, published by Daughters of Utah Pioneers of Sanpete County, printed by Art City Publishing Co., p. 84. Soii|g of ft Century, edited by Centennial Committee, Manti, Utah, 1949, pp. 17, 143- Inventory of County Archives (Sanpete County), Utah Historical Records Survey, Works Progress Admn, 1941, p. 22. The Shoulders on Which We Stand. lairviev Museum of History and Art and Snow College, funded by Utah Endowment for the Humanities, 1982, pp. 52-55- Demont Howell, Editor; Golden Sanderson, Project Chrmn. The Golden Quarter. Ephraim History, published by Community Press, Provo, 1981, p. 90. REMEMBERING.........AN OLD WEATHERED HOPE Yulene A. Suahton West Valley City, Dtah Professional Division First Place Personal Hecollections The mind does wonderful things. It is able to memoriae a moment in time for one to recall and relive-perhaps a magical memory from childhood, taking a person back to whea days were slow and the whole world seemed special. The huge old barn towered above the other buildings on Grandpa Anderson's homestead in Fountain Green, Utah. It was built about 1912 of good pine, hauled from nearby canyons. Standing about 55 feet above the ground, it was large enough to hold 20 tons of hay piled in loose stacks. A long rope tied to the rafters was used with a pulley of steel and a hay fork, which hung in the center of the very top of the barn, to move hay from wagons into sweet-erne11ing piles. This rope created a magic memory to be part of me forever. One side of the structure was built to house the horses and cattle in stalls wttb mangers where they ate. Doors opened into a big part of the barn where hay was -12-
Format image/jpeg
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-19
Date Modified 2005-02-19
ID 324711
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6j67f3x/324711