Contents

Only Love and Faith Could Do It All

Update item information
Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 13
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1981
Type Image
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6xd0ztc
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 324356
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6xd0ztc

Page Metadata

Title Only Love and Faith Could Do It All
Description "We behold here the stake driven "by Farley P. Pratt in his exploration of this valley. This is our God-appointed, abiding place." Most of the company felt Father Morley's spirit and considered his speech "little less than inspiration!" On November 2*tth the Presidency requested every family to locate south of 'Temple Hill" for protection from the bitter wind and snow that fell so fierce and deep. All but five families complied with the Presidency's request. Some did not want to carry water the 150 yards fron the creek to a better-sheltered canp, but they stayed in the open to their sorrow. In the dug-outs sculpted fron the hill, the colonists Here much warmer 3M were fairly comfortable. Even the Indians testified that this was the worst winter ever experienced in that area. Hany died and a lot of their livestock, so needed and so precious, died, too. The Indians fell upon these frozen carcasses and used them for food. This kept the savages from much hostility and stealing and begging. The terrible frosts had turned this whole valley as brown as the hard-faced old Chief Sanpitch and his warriors. They had to scavenge for food and the poorer tribes died by the dozens from lack of food. One blizzard after another, all through January I85O, laid such deep coverlets and blankets of snow, but did help the new-found-valley-home for having water for good crops the next summer. The snow was so deep that they could not uncover enough grass for the browsing of the livestock they did have left. Coyotes and wolves regularly attacked the weak and starving ones. A supply train trying to come to their aid became snow-bound in Salt Creek Canyon, and Father Morley, now 65 years old, and a party of men kept going back and forth on improvised snow-shoes, all those miles, to carry enough supplies to keep his beloved fellow Saints alive. Oh, what a debt of gratitude is owed by those of us who belong to these sturdy, industrious, faithful, people, who all this time were suffering, yet building a few buildings with nearby logs from the canyons. A school house was one of the first priorities. Education Has, and has always been, so important to our people. President Morley traveled, at Chief Walker's request, to his camp where they had suffered much death and a measles eplde&lc, too. Father Horley (so-called by red-man and white-man alike) gave them from their scarce medicines and food for the sick. -31-
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 046_Only Love and Faith Could Do It All.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 13
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-19
Date Modified 2005-02-19
ID 324306
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6xd0ztc/324306