Contents

Two Many Acres, But Not Enough Freedom

Update item information
Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 17
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1985
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6348hhs
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 323344
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6348hhs

Page Metadata

Title Two Many Acres, But Not Enough Freedom
Description Stake President Isaac Morley, Sr., found out about this travesty sooner, and had known how Doc was suffering; but because of his heavy duties and being gone so much of the time, had never found out that the authorities had never reverseo this sad affair. He traveled the whole stake, which encompassed all of Sanpete, Hillard, Juab, and other counties, and all of Dixie. He caroe to Moroni to hold a stake conference and was shocked at the state Doc was in. He traveled by horse and buggy and paused in many places to give patriarchal blessings along his way. He immediately gave Grandpa a blessing. He told the new church president and authorities about this incident and they called a meeting at once, requesting Grandpa and family to join thera. The first matter of business was to reinstate Brother William Draper's membership and assure him that his life-long desire would be honored, that he would be honored with a worthy and meaningful funeral service and that he WOULD be buried in his temple robes, which he prized so much, What a joy this was to his whole large posterity and to the settlements around Moroni. They kept He is buried in a lovely spot, a plot of his loved land in the shadow of the beautiful mountains and Box Canyon that he knew and loved so well. It is fenced with a high, beautiful linked-chain fence, through the caring efforts of two grandchildren, Erma and husband Earl Livingston, Fay Draper, Pearl Madsen Olsen. Other former residents acquired ownership, water rights and held fund raisings to help save and preserve this quiet place for Grandpa and his own. In May 1886, William Lathrop Draper, Sr., Doc's father,died in his eightieth year. He was buried here in this precious, hallowed place along with two of Doc's children. In only one year, May 2, 1887, Doc joined his father in his last sleep and at last was sure of his never being threatened again of losing his beloved "Freedom." 39
Format image/jpeg
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-23
Date Modified 2005-02-23
ID 323343
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6348hhs/323343