Contents

Doing Your Bit

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 17
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1985
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6348hhs
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 323344
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6348hhs

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Title Doing Your Bit
Description BYU President George H. Brimhall composed a beautiful patriotic song entitled "Old Glory," which our school class usually sang in our morning opening exercises, It was a favorite. President Heber J. Grant taught himself to sing just one patriotic song that had great appeal, called "The Flag Without a Stain." He proudly sang it on many occasions, usually by request. We had numerous bond rallies" where people pledged to buy as many bonds as possible. We'd often have leading people from other cities give urgent pleas for help. At times we would have a band play and always patriotic songs. I'd like to give a few lines from one song, which I think are apropos: What are you going to do for Uncle Sammy? What are you going to do to help the boys? When you're far away from home, fighting o'er the foam, The least that you can do is buy a Liberty Bond or two. We had new words and phrases emerge as an outgrowth of the war, some of which are still in use today. Such words as "camouflage, "Ace," "slacker," to name a few. One phrase stands out because of its frequent use and strong appeal--"Doing your bit." A "bit" adds up to a great amount if consistently given. On that sunny day of November 11, 1918, my brother and I were enjoying a moment of inertia by lying on our stomachs on the warm earth at the beet dump between Moroni and Mt. Pleasant where we weighed beets. Suddenly, a cacaphony of sound exploded around us. A long procession of cars hurtled by bearing dozens of people shouting, singing, honking. We heard the strains of "It's Over Over There." On the back of the last car, tall, red painted letters spelled out the word PEACE!! 23
Format image/jpeg
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-23
Date Modified 2005-02-23
ID 323255
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6348hhs/323255