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Healers and Healing

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 17
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1985
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6348hhs
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 323344
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6348hhs

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Title Healers and Healing
Description HEALERS AND HEALING Mary Louise Madsen Seamons 1774 South 340 East Orem, UT 84058 Non-Professional Division Third Place Historical Essay Healers and healing have been revered since the beginning of recorded history Superstition, old wives1 tales, herbs, faith--each has at one time or another been significant in the history of a people. Those who have had success in healing have been held in high esteem by their fellow men. Medicine as we know it today is relatively new, though evidence indicates that much was known about surgery and healing even during the reigns of Egyptian kings whose tombs have revealed much to our knowledge--yet leave much more to be learned. In Scandinavia as recently as the seventeen and eighteen hundreds, the village apothecary, such things as droppings from horses, cows, and sap from fir trees for gall bladder; droppings from geese mixed with beer and drunk for treating yellow fever; rattlesnake fat for treating redeye; sacred springs (water); and herbs of all kinds-some of which were helpful and are still used Patients were bled as cures for a variety of illnesses, many of them fatal--possibly due to the loss of blood. Dentistry in Scandinavia, probably elsewhere as well, was mainly performed by the "wise old women" of the parish. Later, in America and other countries, local barbers were also local dentists, this being true within the memories of some still living. Hospitals were more feared than sought. There was no adequate care for the sick, or hospitals that could really be called hospitals, until around 1750 in Scandinavia. Other countries followed similar timelines. Also within the memory of old and young alike is the development of serums to protect 57
Format image/jpeg
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-23
Date Modified 2005-02-23
ID 323259
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6348hhs/323259