Contents

Groundcheery Dresses

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 17
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1985
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6348hhs
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 323344
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6348hhs

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Title Groundcheery Dresses
Description brushes alongside the road, but the girls seemed unaware of all this beauty. They had a problem, a worrisome problem. They needed new dresses, which Mama said they couldn't afford. There was no money even to buy the cloth. Last night, after supper, they had sat on the kitchen steps and talked and wondered and planned as to what could be done so they could earn enough extra money for the much needed dresses. It was then that Papa came up with an idea, „ .pick and drv groundcherries. All the fruit trees planted in Manti were still too young to bear fruit. If the cherries were picked and dried, later they could be soaked in water, sweetened with molasses or sugar and then cooked to nake an excellent jam. Papa was sure this dried fruit could be sold. . .and their monies. . .new dresses! Groundcherries grew wild in patches of bushes all along the roadside south of Manti. The plant was an annual, which seeded itself from year to year. Each plant was perhaps 18 inches to two feet in height and had an abundance of green leaves, which hid plump, six-sided, veined pods. Inside each pod was a small greenish cherry, about the size of a marble. To get the cherry, one had to break or pop the pod, from which the one small cherry could then be taken. Papa stopped the wagon near a large patch of bushes and helped the girls unload a wooden bucket, various baskets, and other paraphernalia under a nearby cedar tree. As he was leaving, he called out, "Take care of yourselves until I get back this afternoon. Hatch out for snakes, and don't smash the bushes. You can sit in the shade of this tree and pod the cherries when you get tired. The important thing is to get the pods picked while you are here." And with that he drove out of sight. The girls' enthusiasm ran high, but as the sun became more hot they moved more slowly. Stooping to pick the pods was back-breaking work, but soon the girls had a bucket filled with pods. The friendly cedar tree furnished shade, and the girls rested while they opened the pods and dislodged the 36
Format image/jpeg
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-23
Date Modified 2005-02-23
ID 323257
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6348hhs/323257