Contents

Indian Stories

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 17
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1985
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6348hhs
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 323344
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6348hhs

Page Metadata

Title Indian Stories
Description older, the language barrier was causing him problems and with the handicap of his peg-leg finding a job was almost impossible. When a call came out from the leaders of the LDS Church that men were needed to work on the new project of building the Manti Temple, Henry went to Manti, Twelve days later one hundred men knelt in prayer at the site to ask for guidance and help in accomplishing this great work, Up temple hill he hobbled with his one peg-leg and his one good leg. Ropes were attached to posts to help Henry and others needing help up the hill. Here he worked, sitting in the same position all day, chipping with his chisel the rock that had been quarried and hauled to the brow of the hill. Sometimes he pounded the rock chips into fine sand to be used in mixing the mortar for ceraenting together the huge blocks of oolite stone in the temple walls. The stonecutters and masons were of various ancestry. Some of the workers walked from Ephraim to Hanti each Monday morning and returned home on Saturday night. Henry also traveled at times to rJaLes, Utah, when his week's work was done. Some workers stayed at the old Templeton Hotel, and others used tents for their homes away from home. Sometimes the stakes were requested to furnish their workers with provisions and supplies, one month s rations at a time. TJhile these men were away from hone, local people helped to sustain their families, The laborers worked an average of ten hours a day, six days a week. Henry's greatest asset was faith in God and a desire to do His will. Therefore, he steadfastly accepted his job at the temple and continued his work with a will that never faltered. He was always happy as he sat day in and day out for long periods of time chiseling rock for the temple, Workers watched him with pride and with a little awe and confusion at how diligently he sat, patiently and without complaint, chiseling rock, watching the progress of the majestic edifice, as each rock he cut helped to take form in the massive structure. 119
Format image/jpeg
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-23
Date Modified 2005-02-23
ID 323295
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6348hhs/323295