Contents

Cats and Hats

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 25
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1993
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6nz85tx
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 324626
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6nz85tx

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Title Cats and Hats
Description CATS AND HATS Rose Mclff Senior Division First Place Personal Recollection Living in Sanpete County is a rare privilege. As each new season arrives with its color, the country becomes an artist's paradise, and this is especially true of Sterling, Utah. The Cottonwood and birch trees still follow the creek as the water winds its way to the red hills west of town. My home was on a hill overlooking such a view along the old Sanpete County Highway 89, only a few blocks away from the railroad tracks, Cars were quite scarce in the twenties and thirties. More horses and wagons were seen, with an occasional buggy or two. That is why we would wait for a strange car to go by and wave to those who passed. Elmer Ludvigson and La Preal Snow Ludvigson were my parents. They worked hard on their 40-acre farm. The people on the west side of Sterling were neighborly, visiting back and forth. When Mother baked fresh bread, pie, cake, rolls or cookies, we would invite our neighbors to come and enjoy them with us. Al that time, she would go out on the edge of the hill and wave a white dishtowel. They would respond by waving another dish towel, meaning they would be over soon. Many folks came to visit us, especially in the summer. Our relatives from the city would often come to visit. They loved everything that was on our farm. My Mama's cooking was a special treat to all. They loved the cream and butter and also the cured ham. Papa really entertained them. This was always by request. Some of Papa's relatives worked for the railroad. They had railroad passes and could ride the train and get off near the Gunnison Reservoir. From there they walked to our home. After the chores were done, we would have a show. The people would sit on our porch steps and the stage was the lawn in front. The children always had a cat sbow. The two requirements were to dress them in doll clothes and newspaper shoes on their feet. The cats would aci very funny with their shoes on. Children would especially laugh. Papa would then auction off the cats. The next game involved everyone. Papa would call one at a time up to get a hat. Then he gave each a famous name to act out. He would tell about that person, such as the Wall Street
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 019_Cats and Hats.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 25
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-19
Date Modified 2005-02-19
ID 324539
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6nz85tx/324539